222

Shelly Berg: Blackbird

Jim Santella By

Sign in to view read count
This program of sensual ballads gives the Shelly Berg Trio plenty of room to express deep feelings about the music and about how jazz has given each member a long and fruitful career doing what he loves. Each solos frequently and passionately, but with subdued emphasis. A ballad caress needn't be amplified or swung hard. The meaning becomes clearer when an audience is given the chance to absorb it gradually. Here, the pianist, bassist, and drummer set these wheels in motion naturally. Romance and lyrical passion occupy the front seats by default.

Berg pounds out "I Hear a Rhapsody" with the enthusiasm that he's been recognized for on previous recordings and in live appearances. Long known as a powerful swinger and forceful driver, he can't help making a lasting impression.

The remainder of the session, however, is devoted to tender interpretations that sizzle underneath the surface. Berg ensures that each melodic phrase is woven seamlessly through the trio's interpretations. He uses up every ounce of strength available in his thorough treatment of a song but restrains the urge to shout it out loudly. Instead, the pianist and his partners find a quiet release for their tales. The listener, of course, is free to add an "Amen" or a "Yeah" as often as he sees fit. It's that kind of a listening experience.

Even Berg's "Hot it Up," though framed within a forceful, hard bop landscape, shows up somewhat quiet and decidedly cool. It's a chance to sit back and enjoy without being overwhelmed by the force of the music. Blackbird ranks as Berg's best recording thus far and comes highly recommended. His "Julia" closes the album with a slow and romantic appreciation for the natural direction that acoustic ballads should always come to us: from the heart.


Track Listing: All My Tomorrows; Estate; Blackbird; I Hear a Rhapsody; Question and Answer; A Flower is a Lovesome Thing; All the Things You Are; Hot it Up; Blame it on the Sun; She's Always a Woman; If I Should Lose You; Julia.

Personnel: Shelly Berg: piano; Chuck Berghofer: bass; Gregg Field: drums.

Title: Blackbird | Year Released: 2005 | Record Label: Concord Music Group


Tags

comments powered by Disqus

More Articles

Read For the Love of You CD/LP/Track Review For the Love of You
by Jack Bowers
Published: October 21, 2017
Read Recent Developments CD/LP/Track Review Recent Developments
by John Sharpe
Published: October 21, 2017
Read Triple Double CD/LP/Track Review Triple Double
by Glenn Astarita
Published: October 21, 2017
Read Agrima CD/LP/Track Review Agrima
by Jerome Wilson
Published: October 21, 2017
Read The Study of Touch CD/LP/Track Review The Study of Touch
by Karl Ackermann
Published: October 20, 2017
Read Another North CD/LP/Track Review Another North
by Roger Farbey
Published: October 19, 2017
Read "Do Not Go Gently" CD/LP/Track Review Do Not Go Gently
by Ian Patterson
Published: July 19, 2017
Read "Day After Day" CD/LP/Track Review Day After Day
by John Eyles
Published: July 21, 2017
Read "Confidences" CD/LP/Track Review Confidences
by Jack Bowers
Published: February 3, 2017
Read "Prick of the Litter" CD/LP/Track Review Prick of the Litter
by Doug Collette
Published: January 28, 2017
Read "Honest Woman" CD/LP/Track Review Honest Woman
by James Nadal
Published: February 20, 2017
Read "Hot Coffey in the D – Burnin at Morey Baker’s Showplace Lounge" CD/LP/Track Review Hot Coffey in the D – Burnin at Morey Baker’s...
by C. Michael Bailey
Published: January 4, 2017

Join the staff. Writers Wanted!

Develop a column, write album reviews, cover live shows, or conduct interviews.