ADVERTISE WITH US
Learn How

We need your help in 2018

Support All About Jazz All About Jazz is looking for readers to help fund our 2018 projects that directly support jazz. You can make this happen by purchasing ad space or by making a donation to our fund drive. In addition to completing every project (listed here), we'll also hide all Google ads and present exclusive content for a full year!

Mark Corroto

Mark misses his large dog Louie, but endeavors daily to find and listen to new and interesting sounds.

About Me

At first told he was raised by gypsies, later found it was wolves, Mark discovered jazz by way of Raymond Scott and Carl Stalling's music for Warner Brothers' cartoons. Early on he wondered why the saxophone solos on Pink Floyd's Dark Side Of The Moon and Van Morrison's Moondance were so bad. "You're a jazz critic, that's why" a friendly drifter told him. Mark packed his bags and waited for a passenger train to the Big Apple, only to find the train station boarded up. He's lived in Ohio ever since.

My Jazz Story

I love jazz because besides descending a mountain on a road bicycle at 55 mph or a glass of Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, nothing makes my endorphins rush like an Albert Ayler or Mats Gustafsson solo. I was first exposed to jazz watching Warner Brother's cartoons. I met Peter Brotzmann in 1991 at a show in Youngstown, Ohio. He was (to my surprise) such a gentle soul, and inspiring artist. The best show I ever attended was... hmm... that's a hard one, either the Sun Ra Arkestra 1989, Naked City 1993, or Randy Weston ensemble 1987, maybe Sonny Rollins in New York 1993, or was it The Thing 2003? Maybe Matt Wilson's Quartet last year. The first jazz record I bought was Weather Report's Mysterious Traveller. My advice to new listeners...Don't ask me if this particular recording is good jazz, if YOU like it it's good jazz, if YOU don't it isn't good jazz. Jazz is about exploring, connecting the dots: Miles Davis played with John Coltrane and Charlie Parker (who started bebop) - But also made funky electric music, and Carlos Santana recorded Coltrane's Love Supreme with John McLaughlin, who played with Miles and Miles' drummer Tony Williams, which might be the first fusion. Everyone references Louis Armstrong, who's career paralleled bebop but wasn't bebop, although Dizzy Gillespie, another bebop originator was quite taken and inspired by Satchmo. The threads running between players and styles cross and loop endlessly. There is a lifetime of study (that's a bad word), I mean enjoyment as chasing the dots and connections.

My Favorites

  1. John Coltrane - Love Supreme
  2. Albert Ayler - Live In Greenwich Village
  3. Beastie Boys - Check Your Head
  4. Clusone 3 - An Hour With
  5. Bill Frisell - Music for the Films of Buster Keaton
  6. Cassandra Wilson - Blue Skies
  7. Rahsaan Roland Kirk - Bright Moments
  8. David Murray - Spirituals
  9. Evan Parker - Lines Burnt In Light
  10. Horace Tapscott - The Dark Tree