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Extended Analysis

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Dave's Picks Volume 20: CU Events Center, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO - December 9, 1981

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Dave's Pick's Volume 20 marks a milestone in the Grateful Dead's current archive series, its significance not lost on the curator, David Lemieux. Yet rather than indulge in nostalgia in his notes accompanying this set, the man chooses to take the success of the series as further inspiration to carry on, not just with these quarterly releases, but the judicious exhumation of the iconic band's vault in general. A little over a year after the Grateful Dead began ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

The Rolling Stones: Blue and Lonesome

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It was the love for blues and R&B music that bonded two teenage music aficionados Mick Jagger and Keith Richards and this music was the building blocks on which they based their work of art--the band The Rolling Stones. 50 years ago when the Rolling Stones' songwriting partnership between these two began gaining its momentum and they started writing their own songs, the band slowly began abandoning their all-blues cover records approach and commenced branching and welcoming more diverse music ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Nat Birchall: Creation

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Coming less than a year after the 2015 release Invocations on Henley's Jazzman records, Creation finds Nat Birchall back on his own Sound Soul and Spirit label. Long term collaborator Adam Fairhall on piano, and Johnny Hunter on drums are retained from that record and we welcome back Andy Hay as a second drummer, last heard on 2011's 'Sacred Dimension' as well as saying hello to new boy Michael Bardon on bass. Whether influenced by the line-up changes ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Harvey Mandel: Snake Pit

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One of the major proponents of contemporary blues-rock guitar, Harvey Mandel has some impressive credentials nonetheless. Cutting his teeth in the Chicago well-spring of the blues, he collaborated with harpist Charlie Musselwhite, among others in that scene and subsequently became a pivotal member of Canned Heat around the apogee of their career, including their appearance at Woodstock 1969. He also played with the John Mayall, as 'The Godfather of British Blues.' was exploring variations on his own long-stated theme of ...

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Leonard Cohen: You Want it Darker

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On first listen, Leonard Cohen's album You Want it Darker is a great album. On second listen, it could rank among his best and on third listen, it is obvious that it is the best contender for a Nobel Prize in literature in the next turn of awards. But so are the other albums that have preceded it. It is astonishing that Cohen as an elder statesman is producing some of his best work at this stage of his career. ...

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King Crimson: On (and Off) The Road

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Sometimes the best music--and some of the best bands--are those that come from the most difficult of births. When King Crimson co-founder/guitarist Robert Fripp had the idea for a new band after dissolving the last incarnation of the '70s-era Crimson lineups seven years prior, it was a completely new concept and, with the exception of returning drummer Bill Bruford, a totally revised lineup. Gone were the mellotrons and symphonic leanings of old. In their place: technological advancements including ...

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Eve Risser White Desert Orchestra: Les Deux Versants Se Regardent

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Space in jazz, in the musical rather than the science fiction sense, is a difficult thing to pull off effectively. Miles Davis may well have said “don't play what's there, play what's not there" but Mr Davis said a lot of things including “if you don't know what to play, play nothing." Its like talking quietly--if you want people to make the effort to listen what you do have to say, then what you venture had better be good. You ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Ian Hunter: Fingers Crossed

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Assuming his role as chief vocalist for Mott the Hoople, then becoming its main songwriter, Ian Hunter evolved into the figurative voice for the British band as it evolved and reached its apex of commercial and critical acclaim with Mott (Columbia Records, 1973). And as he initiated his solo career, Hunter was able to tailor the persona Hunter created for the band into one equally personal to him as an individual, an approach he maintains on Fingers Crossed, his fifteenth ...


All About Vince Guaraldi!

An exclusive opportunity for All About Jazz readers to participate in the celebration of a jazz legend.