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Extended Analysis

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Jasper Høiby: Fellow Creatures

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Creativity is an unpredictable beast, yesterday's inspiration can soon turn stale, evaporating with the morning dew if not carefully cultivated and attended to. That idea that was once so exciting can easily become a well-worn rut, or even a trap, into which the unwary can fall. Bassist Jasper Hoiby, a third of Phronesis, appears to recognise the benefits of staying creatively fresh on this fantastic new record, explicitly taking the time to try something different, and, possibly, recharging the creative ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Levin Minnemann Rudess: From the Law Offices of Levin Minnemann Rudess

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It may look good on paper, but you can never really know how “super group" collaborations are going to work out until they actually get together and do something. In the case of the power trio named after its members--bassist/stick player Tony Levin (Peter Gabriel, King Crimson, Stick Men), drummer/guitarist Marco Minnemann (Steven Wilson, The Aristocrats, Joe Satriani) and keyboardist Jordan Rudess (Dream Theater, Liquid Tension Experiment), all names familiar to progressive rock fans--it would seem a low-risk proposition, given ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Grateful Dead: Dave's Pick's Vol. 19: Honolulu, Hawaii, 1/23/70

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Grateful Dead archivist David Lemieux has done yeoman's work to distinguish his archival series of recordings from that of his esteemed predecessor Dick Latvala and Vol. 19 is no exception . But this edition of Dave's Picks, from Honolulu, Hawaii in January of 1970, has much in common with a release from Dick's Picks, while simultaneously setting itself apart from those which preceded it (except for the fact it too sold through its limited run). The most significant ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Tony Williams: Life Time

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By now, it's an irrefutable fact that drummer Tony Williams was the youngest preeminent figure within the avant-garde movement of the mid-'60s. Every jazz fan seems to know the events that led to his international fame: after intriguing trumpeter Miles Davis with his cutting-edge approach to drumming, he was hired and added to the groundbreaking “Second Great Quintet" at the ripe age of 17. During this significant stint, Williams altered the trajectory of Davis' music, solidified himself as a drum ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Neil Young & The Promise of The Real: Earth

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Ninety-plus minutes of performances recorded live on tour in 2015, then interspersed with sounds of the planet natural (birds and thunder) and manufactured (car traffic and trains), Neil Young's double-CD Earth documents his social concerns and the synergy he's developed with his most recent accompanists, Lukas Nelson and The Promise of the Real. A song selection spanning the rock icon's career, plus one unreleased number (an ode to the weed movement “Seed Justice" was originally and cryptically titled “I Won't ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Grateful Dead ‎– Dave's Picks Volume 18: Orpheum Theatre, San Francisco 7/17/76

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The Grateful Dead exhibit the positive effects of their self-imposed 1975 hiatus on Dave's Picks Volume 18 and its accompanying bonus disc recorded at the Orpheum Theatre in San Francisco. Of course, the quietly relaxed approach to the setlist, and the choices thereon, might well be signaled by the opening of Chuck Berry's “Promised Land"--the band played his material when they already felt REALLY good or were anxiously trying to--and the first set closing of “Johnny B. Goode."

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Cuong Vu Trio Meets Pat Metheny

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A good chunk of the jazz-consuming public first became aware of Cuong Vu's virtuoso trumpet playing via his work with the Pat Metheny Group during the 2000s. For those of us already familiar with Vu's work, the move seemed a bit out-of-character, as the young trumpeter was a prominent player in the hyper-adventurous downtown NYC scene that coalesced around the Knitting Factory. To some, Metheny was a part of the jazz establishment; the very thing that the Knitting Factory scene ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Bad Company: Live 1977 & 1979

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Formed from the fragments of Free and Mott the Hoople, Bad Company took a careerist approach to their efforts together from the very start. Much publicity surrounded the announcement of their alliance including the fact the quartet's debut album was the first release from Led Zeppelin's custom label Swan Song. Add to that a timeline beginning in the early to mid-Seventies, accentuated by continuing demand since the demise of the original lineup depicted on Bad Company Live 1977-1979it's altogether mystifying ...


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