Extended Analysis

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Alex Cline's Flower Garland Orchestra: Oceans of Vows

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Despite being a key participant in the “Left Coast" scene of more avant-leaning music from the American west coast--in particular, part of the Cryptogramophone imprint that, while less active than in its “glory days" during the first years of the new millennium--Alex Cline releases so infrequently as a leader that any new music from the percussionist/composer is worthy of attention. That he has flown so far under the radar, in recent years, that his last Cryptogramophone release, 2013's For People ...

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Wingfield Reuter Stavi Sirkis: The Stone House

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At a 2009 ECM @ 40 celebration in Mannheim, Germany that was part of the ongoing Enjoy Jazz Festival, Italian trumpeter Enrico Rava spoke, in a public interview, about how free jazz, back in the day, wasn't really free. There were rules: no time and/or no changes, for example; with memorable melodies not impossible, but not encouraged. Rava continued on to enthuse that now, in the 21st Century, free jazz really is free: if you want to play time, you ...

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Jazz Is Phsh: He Never Spoke A Word

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Phish prefer not to be compared to the Grateful Dead in any respect, which is understandable up to a point, yet it's fair to say each band's respective legacy has its own momentum including twists and turns of evolution that inevitably result in parallels and intersections illuminating the process(es). So it is that Jazz Is Phsh follows in the footsteps of Jazz Is Dead as the former group interprets the Vermont band's material. Yet, in a subtle nod ...

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Tim Bowness: Lost in the Ghostlight

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It's a somewhat hidden truth that a sizeable percentage of any musician's fan base believes that the music their favorite artists make is a direct reflection of their tastes. While an artist's music ought, indeed, be a reflection of what moves them, it's another truth that, more often than not, their listening habits run much farther afield. One way to develop a more thorough appreciation for an artist's tastes, touchstones and influences is to look at their entire ...

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Way Down Inside: Songs of Willie Dixon

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Big Head Todd and the Monsters have been fans of blues music since their first days together playing music in high school, so it only makes sense they'd eventually record am album in this seminal form. Accordingly, in 2011 the band delved into the blues with their first 'Big Head Blues Club' project, 100 Years of Robert Johnson (Big Records, 2011), which featured guest appearances by BB King, Hubert Sumlin, Charlie Musselwhite, Honeyboy Edwards, and others. The success of that ...

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Chicago II (Steven Wilson Remix)

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It's rare that an opportunity presents itself to directly compare a high resolution remaster with a high resolution remix, but with last year's Quadio (Rhino) box set containing Blu Ray Audio versions (at 24-bit/192KHz) of its first nine studio recordings (including, curiously, a completely superfluous, early Greatest Hits package) and the recent, single-disc reissue of Chicago II, featuring a brand new stereo mix by remix go-to-guy, Porcupine Tree founder and now-successful solo artist Steven Wilson, there's a chance to do ...

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Dave's Picks Volume 20: CU Events Center, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO - December 9, 1981

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Dave's Pick's Volume 20 marks a milestone in the Grateful Dead's current archive series, its significance not lost on the curator, David Lemieux. Yet rather than indulge in nostalgia in his notes accompanying this set, the man chooses to take the success of the series as further inspiration to carry on, not just with these quarterly releases, but the judicious exhumation of the iconic band's vault in general. A little over a year after the Grateful Dead began ...

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The Rolling Stones: Blue and Lonesome

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It was the love for blues and R&B music that bonded two teenage music aficionados Mick Jagger and Keith Richards and this music was the building blocks on which they based their work of art--the band The Rolling Stones. 50 years ago when the Rolling Stones' songwriting partnership between these two began gaining its momentum and they started writing their own songs, the band slowly began abandoning their all-blues cover records approach and commenced branching and welcoming more diverse music ...

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Nat Birchall: Creation

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Coming less than a year after the 2015 release Invocations on Henley's Jazzman records, Creation finds Nat Birchall back on his own Sound Soul and Spirit label. Long term collaborator Adam Fairhall on piano, and Johnny Hunter on drums are retained from that record and we welcome back Andy Hay as a second drummer, last heard on 2011's 'Sacred Dimension' as well as saying hello to new boy Michael Bardon on bass. Whether influenced by the line-up changes ...


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