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Daniel Carter: Radical Invisibilty

Read "Radical Invisibilty" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

Always on the farthest fringe of both the downtown New York music scene and the jazz world at large hasn't stopped multi-instrumentalist Daniel Carter from leaving an indelible imprint on the greater consciousness. He has worked alongside other mavericks, notably Thurston Moore, Yoko Ono, Cecil Taylor, and Jaco Pastorius. His horns are fiery, disruptive and probing, exultant and brooding, seething and, since the mid-70's, searching as incessantly and masterfully for the right note at the right time. That ...

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Federico Ughi: Transoceanico

Read "Transoceanico" reviewed by Patrick Burnette

Dozens of jazz albums modeled on trumpeter Miles Davis's Miles Smiles (Columbia, 1966) or saxophonist John Coltrane's Crescent (Impulse!, 1964) get released each year, but a record reminiscent of Albert Ayler's Spiritual Unity (ESP-Disc, 1964) is less common. Drummer Federico Ughi's Transoceanico nods vigorously in Ayler's direction, even as it marks Ughi's twentieth anniversary as a leader. As part of the celebration, Transoceanico features saxophonist Rachel Musson, who also appeared on Ughi's debut release. Bassist Adam Lane rounds out the ...

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Daniel Carter, Tobias Wilner, Djibril Toure, Federico Ughi.: New York United

Read "New York United" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

Like all folk musics exposed to migration, the rhythms shift and drone. The bottom falls out of harmonic structures and then reconstitutes from thin air. Oratorical woodwinds, strings, horns and whistles mournfully proclaim or brightly celebrate. Bringing New York folk music to light, New York United open their self-titled disc with the pulsating “Canal Street," a sonic imagining of the east-west thoroughfare severing Lower Manhattan but uniting Chinatown, Little Italy, and a host of smaller ethnic enclaves along its loud, ...

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Daniel Carter - Matthew Putman - Patrick Holmes - Hilliard Greene - Federico Ughi: Telepatia Liquida

Read "Telepatia Liquida" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

New York-based improvising stalwart Daniel Carter (reeds, trumpet) and other regional artists perform on this 37-minute improv fest, marked by alternating flows and shifting cadences. The album title translates into a 'telepathic understanding,' which of course, is always a positive component for free-spirited dialogues and fruitful artistic ingenuity. Classically trained pianist Matthew Putman is a noted scientist specializing in nanotechnology, and gets the job done here as he comps, mimics and enjoys fertile dialogues with his cohorts. Ultimately, ...

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Kirk Knuffke / Federico Ughi / Chris Welcome: Garden Of Gifts

Read "Garden Of Gifts" reviewed by Mark Corroto

There are no signposts to direct towards great free improvisation recordings, because there are no scenic overlooks where it's possible to pull over and take a snapshot or buy a postcard before heading to the next tourist attraction. To take in a recording such as Garden Of Gifts, it's necessary to stand back and take in the whole--the same way the Grand Canyon has to be viewed.

Garden Of Gifts was recorded in May at drummer Federico Ughi's house in ...

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Sabir Mateen: Prophecies Come to Pass

Read "Prophecies Come to Pass" reviewed by Jeff Stockton

The Shapes, Textures and Sound Ensemble is a quintessential downtown New York jazz group in the tradition of Other Dimensions in Music and Test--as intense and impassioned as music honed on the street should be: tough, but coherent and highly skilled. Led by veteran reedman Sabir Mateen on alto, tenor, flute and clarinets, none of the players in the Ensemble are more than a degree or two outside of the wide shadow cast by William Parker's Little Huey Creative Orchestra--and ...

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Sabir Mateen: Prophecies Come To Pass

Read "Prophecies Come To Pass" reviewed by Troy Collins

On Prophecies Come To Pass, saxophonist Sabir Mateen's Shapes, Textures, and Sound Ensemble delivers a rousing program of classic free jazz that rarely relents in its intensity. Recorded live in Brooklyn, this album captures the group at its rapturous best. Dedicated to late trumpeter Raphe Malik, the ensemble pushes its post-Ayler dynamics to the heavens.

Multi-instrumentalist Mateen coaxes an array of sounds from his many horns; his alto is light and buoyant, with an assertive edge; his raucous ...


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