Articles

Daily articles carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. Read our popular and future articles.

ALBUM REVIEW

Bobby Shew / Bill Mays: Telepathy

Read "Telepathy" reviewed by Nicholas F. Mondello

Trumpet and piano duo albums are relatively rare. Louis Armstrong and Earl “Fatha" Hines' “Weather Bird" (1928) was a groundbreaker, although a single. Oscar Peterson and Dizzy Gillespie (Pablo, 1974) and Clark Terry's One on One (Chesky Records, 1999), where CT played with fourteen different jazz pianists, come to mind. Telepathy, a horn-piano collaboration featuring trumpeter Bobby Shew and pianist Bill Mays, continues the tradition—and, brilliantly so. Originally recorded in 1978 and released in 1982, the session is an exploration ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Alex Hitchcock: All Good Things

Read "All Good Things" reviewed by Roger Farbey

The Alex Hitchcock Quintet's first record, Live at the London and Cambridge Jazz Festivals, was released in 2018 as an EP on Mondo Tunes. But at around 40 minutes this could easily have passed muster as a pukka LP. It was also a very impressive debut indeed, captured live from gigs performed in 2016 and 2017 at London and Cambridge respectively. Londoner Hitchcock attended the North London Weekend Arts College (WAC) where several British jazz stars began their careers, including ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Yaniv Taubenhouse Trio: Perpetuation: Moments In Trio Volume Two

Read "Perpetuation: Moments In Trio Volume Two" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Anyone with an antenna out for an exciting, new(ish) piano trio would do well to give Yaniv Taubenhouse a listen. The Israeli-born and now New York-based pianist offers up his third recording, tagged Perpetuation: Moments In Trio Volume Two, bringing to mind Brad Mehldau's five Art of the Trio recordings on Warner Brothers Records, released between 1997 and 2001. Taubenhouse studied with Mehldau, and the disc's opening title tune has a Mehldau-ian feel, with a persistent but understated ...

ALBUM REVIEW

David Ambrosio: Four On The Road

Read "Four On The Road" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

Bassist David Ambrosio and his trio indulge in smooth sailing, partly due to alto saxophonist Loren Stillman's feathery tones via these largely, medium-tempo bop works, complete with contrapuntal type exchanges and spry breakouts. Several of these piece seem to intertwine within a similar framework and cadence, although there are a few free-form sorties, sparked by Ambrosio and drummer Russ Meisner's asymetrical patterns and staggered flows. On the flip side, the the rhythm section consistently lays out a pronounced, ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Dave Allen: The Sky Above Her

Read "The Sky Above Her" reviewed by Troy Dostert

Guitarist Dave Allen's satiny-smooth tone and precise technique belie an intrepid sensibility that is eager to rise to the surface. So unsuspecting listeners who cue up the title track of The Sky Above Her, Allen's third album as a leader, might at first be tricked into thinking they'll be listening to something easy on the ears, as the track possesses an ingratiating, comfortable feel; Allen's melodicism definitely contributes to that impression. But by the album's second cut, Allen's adventurous side ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Marko Churnchetz: RUTHENIA - Retrospective of Russian Composers of the 20th Century

Read "RUTHENIA - Retrospective of Russian Composers of the 20th Century" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

Slovenian-born pianist/composer Marko Churnchetz presents an ambitious suite for fifteen musicians: essentially his jazz quartet accompanied by a small orchestra of winds and strings. He pays tribute to the great Russian composers of the 20th Century: Shostakovich, Scriabin, Prokofiev, Stravinsky and Rachmaninoff (the title “Ruthenia" is a Latin name for the Russian border provinces and their inhabitants, a metaphor for connecting with the great Russian musical tradition). Even if a listener did not know about the focus, the ...

ALBUM REVIEW

Kind Folk: Why Not

Read "Why Not" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

Back in 2014, trumpeter John Raymond, alto saxophonist Alex LoRe, bassist Noam Wiesenberg, and drummer Colin Stranahan gathered in a tiny apartment in Brooklyn to test out their chemistry and let the music flow. Four years later, after some more sporadic get-togethers and a bump or two in the road, we have their debut. Opening with the buoyant and clear-headed Kenny Wheeler tune that serves as the name (and something of a directional beacon) for this collective ...


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