Support All About Jazz

All About Jazz needs your help and we have a deal. Pay $20 and we'll hide those six pesky Google ads that appear on every page, plus this box and the slideout box on the right for a full year! You'll also fund website expansion.


I want to help

Jazz Articles

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Jeff Denson Trio/Lee Konitz: Jeff Denson + Lee Konitz

Read "Jeff Denson + Lee Konitz" reviewed by

Let us celebrate the life of 87-year old jazz master Lee Konitz. The alto saxophonist has been recording music for seven decades now. While his tone is not as strong these days, his music is arguably more expressive now than ever. Heard here as a guest with bassist Jeff Denson's trio, he adds a new dimension to his performance, singing. In recent live performances, Konitz has set aside his horn to wordless scat sing as he calls them ...

LIVE REVIEWS

Jakob Bro, Lee Konitz, Bill Frisell and Thomas Morgan at Mengi

Read "Jakob Bro, Lee Konitz, Bill Frisell and Thomas Morgan at Mengi" reviewed by

Jakob Bro, Lee Konitz, Bill Frisell, Thomas Morgan Mengi Reykjavík, Iceland May 8, 2015 (2nd show) “I've been waiting for this moment for a long time," said guitarist Jakob Bro to the small, tightly packed audience at Mengi, a vibrant new arts space in downtown Reykjavik. This tour--which besides Iceland also made stops in Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Norway and Greenland--had been some time in coming, for all concerned. It's been ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Ethan Iverson, Lee Konitz, Larry Grenadier & Jorge Rossy: Costumes Are Mandatory

Read "Costumes Are Mandatory" reviewed by

Costumes Are Mandatory is very collegially advertised as a collaborative album featuring Ethan Iverson, Lee Konitz, Larry Grenadier, and Jorge Rossy. And while the music may indeed be collaborative, even multi-improvisational at times, it's Iverson's date and he's very clearly the leader. The record is envisioned as an homage to--"a dialogue with," according to the liner notes--the late blind pianist Lennie Tristano, who in addition to generally being credited as a founder of the 'cool school' (an oversimplification, ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Lee Konitz: Four Classic Albums

Read "Lee Konitz: Four Classic Albums" reviewed by

Besides being one of the few altoists that emerged in the 1950s that doesn't sound like Charlie Parker, Lee Konitz was a true musical adventurer whose explorations in free jazz, electronic instruments, and just all around anything goes sessions resulted in some of the most exciting music that came out of the fifties and beyond. His playing, which is marked by a detachment and intellectualism that can sound rehearsed, isn't for everyone, but there's no doubt that Konitz has, and ...

CATCHING UP WITH

Lee Konitz: What True Improvising Is

Read "Lee Konitz:  What True Improvising Is" reviewed by

Lee Konitz is legendary as one of the great individualists in jazz, an art form that has always placed an extraordinary high value on individualism and unique forms of expression. “I've pretty much dedicated myself to trying to figure out what true improvising is," he says, “as opposed to playing what you know and getting loose with it. I probably have a bit of a unique place in being able to fool around with famous tunes the way I do."

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Lee Konitz / Bill Frisell / Gary Peacock / Joey Baron: Enfants Terribles: Live at the Blue Note

Read "Enfants Terribles: Live at the Blue Note" reviewed by

At almost 85 years old Lee Konitz can play whatever he damn well pleases on his alto saxophone, and it's a good thing he does. He may currently be making some of the most interesting music of his long career. Enfants Terribles: Live at the Blue Note teams Konitz with three first-rate musicians--all jazz stars in their own right--for an album of standards so loosely interpreted that finding the recognizable melody is a bit like a “Where's Waldo" puzzle. It's ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Lee Konitz / Bill Frisell / Gary Peacock / Joey Baron: Enfants Terribles: Live at the Blue Note

Read "Enfants Terribles: Live at the Blue Note" reviewed by

Super groups are, by their very nature, either bright shining stars or catastrophic exploding supernovae. Dream team basketball lineups get beat by upstarts, and the new Stallone/Schwarzenegger/Van Damme movie is sure to be a nonstarter. The reasons for the flops are usually chemistry and vision, both essential requirements.Same can be said for jazz groups. Listen to a longstanding unit work and its affinity is obvious. Assemble a quartet for a night, or fortnight and evidence of its chemistry ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Enfants Terribles: Live at the Blue Note

Read "Enfants Terribles: Live at the Blue Note" reviewed by

Lee Konitz/Bill Frisell/Gary Peacock/Joey Baron Enfants Terribles: Live at the Blue NoteHalf Note Records2012The idea of going into a club and playing a set of standards without any plans, preconceptions or pre-arrangements ain't exactly new; it's what plenty of jazz musicians do, each and every night. But it's one thing to go in and run down some Real Book charts, head-solo-head style, and give everyone a chance to stretch out and solo ...


Join the staff. Writers Wanted!

Develop a column, write album reviews, cover live shows, or conduct interviews.