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BOOK REVIEWS

A Half-Million Dollars: Biographies of Johnny Cash and Jerry Lee Lewis

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It was December 4, 1956. The famous black and white, now sepia photograph snapped that winter afternoon shows four young men, silhouetted against acoustic tile, making joyful noise. Three of the four were standing around the one at the piano, the one who would be king. When this photograph was taken, two of the men were 21-and the other two, 24-years old. Two were Baptists and two the chosen, Assembly of God, with both traditions shot deep in their individual ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Jerry Lee Lewis: The Killer Plays Boogie Woogie Classics by Meade Lux Lewis

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Although Jerry Lee Lewis devoured boogie woogie at the age of ten, he soon incorporated it with gospel and country to develop his own style of rockabilly. But he always admired the giants of boogie woogie, particularly Meade Lux Lewis (who died in a 1964 car crash).

Shortly after this tragedy, Jerry Lee Lewis went into the studio to record a tribute to the fallen giant but omitted a rhythm section entirely, sticking strictly to solo piano. Given the difficulties ...