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IN PICTURES

Nate Najar with the John Toomey Trio at Attucks Theatre

Read "Nate Najar with the John Toomey Trio at Attucks Theatre" reviewed by Mark Robbins

In 1961, under the sponsorship of the U.S. State Department, jazz/classical guitarist Charlie Byrd toured South America. This trip proved to be fortuitous for both Byrd and North America for it introduced Byrd to the Brazilian Bossa Nova. Back in the states Byrd played Bossa Nova tapes for Stan Getz who then convinced producer Creed Taylor to record an album of himself and Byrd playing this new musical stlye. That album, Jazz Samba was released in 1962 and introduced North ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Teodross Avery: After the Rain: A Night for Coltrane

Read "After the Rain: A Night for Coltrane" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard

All modern saxophonists worth their salt relate to John Coltrane in one way or another. Coltrane pushed boundaries and showed new paths in music and never stopped searching. Fortunately, new generations have been ready to take over and pick up on the lessons Coltrane taught. One of them is saxophonist Dr. Teodross Avery. Spurred by his father, Avery started out playing classical guitar, but hearing Coltrane's Giant Steps (Atlantic, 1959) helped him realize that the saxophone was ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Charles Rumback: Cadillac Turns

Read "Cadillac Turns" reviewed by Troy Dostert

Drummer Charles Rumback has cultivated his melodically-informed sensibility on a number of fine records. His 2017 release, Threes (ears&eyes) is a case in point, with plenty of vigor but softened with just the right amount of sentiment. The album at hand, Cadillac Turns, is much the same, although now in a quartet format with James Singleton on bass and Greg Ward on alto saxophone, and with Jim Baker once again featured on piano. The five lengthy cuts, recorded ...

LIVE REVIEWS

Doug Perkins and Jamie Masefield At The Double E Performance Center

Read "Doug Perkins and Jamie Masefield At The Double E Performance Center" reviewed by Doug Collette

Doug Perkins and Jamie Masefield The Double E Performance Center Essex Junction, VT April 10, 2019 It's a fairly safe bet that every music lover knows at least one artist who toils in obscurity, relative or otherwise, at various levels, local and otherwise. The altitude of the profile(s) in question may be grounded in self-promotion, ambition or both, but regardless, it can be as frustrating as it is joyful to relish work that deserves a ...

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A Pride Of Lions: A Pride Of Lions

Read "A Pride Of Lions" reviewed by John Sharpe

Beneath the banner A Pride Of Lions, three American and two French musicians join forces for a cohesive off-the-wall encounter. The outfit merits a name as it's not a one-off. This live recording was culled from a ten-date tour in early 2016, under the auspices of The Bridge, which allowed them to build trust and understanding. Of course, they already had a head start, as multi-instrumentalist Joe McPhee and reedman Daunik Lazro have been regular collaborators since 1996 ...

RADIO

A Conversation with Pianist and Singer Patricia Barber

Read "A Conversation with Pianist and Singer Patricia Barber" reviewed by Lorens Chuno

Patricia Barber's new album, Higher, is a storybook of songs complete with captivating—and sometimes outré—lyrics and a masterful story teller. Join Patricia and me, as she talks about art songs, European audience vs American audience, Shirley Horn, and other subtly related subjects. Higher features Patricia Barber on piano and voice, Patrick Mulcahy on bass, Jon Deitemyer on drums, Neal Alger on acoustic guitar, Jim Gailloreto on tenor saxophone, and Katherine Werbiansky on voice. Playlist ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Be-Bop Deluxe: Sunburst Finish

Read "Sunburst Finish" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

This is 1976 issued gem by the British band led by guitar virtuoso Bill Nelson, projects artsy, erotic and radiant cover art that was ahead of its time, but then again, this ensemble seamlessly merged progressive rock, straight-ahead rock, blues, reggae and fabricated pop music with a college education. This newly re-mastered and expanded 2-CD edition includes the customary bonus tracks on (CD2) and a radio version of the band's memorable, buoyant and intricately designed hit single “Ships in the ...

LIVE REVIEWS

Carla Bley's Trio at the Jazz Standard

Read "Carla Bley's Trio at the Jazz Standard" reviewed by Akinfe Fatou

Carla Bley's Trio Jazz Standard New York, NY March 19, 2019 Carla Bley is extraordinary, savvy, and enigmatic. The Guggenheim Fellow (1972), German Jazz Trophy winner ("A Life of Jazz"--2009), 5-time GRAMMY-nominee and NEA Jazz Master (2015) was joined by her spouse Steve Swallow on electric bass and Andy Sheppard on saxophone at the Jazz Standard for an evening of transfigurations, reinvigorated ensembles, and recherche improvisations underscored by fascinating idiosyncracies. A renowned bandleader, ...

RADIO

Musette Explosion!

Read "Musette Explosion!" reviewed by Ludovico Granvassu

Musette Explosion is a trio featuring Will Holshouser (accordion), Matt Munisteri (guitar) and Marcus Rojas (tuba) which gives a very New York twist to a quintessentially Parisian art-form like Musette music. Together they bring this genre to new places through virtuosic improvisation and original pieces, sonic surprises and adventurous playing, shot through with a sense of fun and an emotional depth. Happy listening! Will Holshouser, Matt Munisteri “Mysterieuse" Musette Explosions (Self-produced) 00:00:00 Musette Explosion ...

HIGHLY OPINIONATED

Why Steely Dan Can Never Really Be Yacht Rock

Read "Why Steely Dan Can Never Really Be Yacht Rock" reviewed by Eric Pettine

The website Really Smooth Music provides the definition of the term Yacht Rock as being “a variation of popular Soft Rock that peaked between the years of 1976 and 1984 (as featuring a) highly polished brand of soft rock that emanated from Southern California during the late '70s and early '80s. The term is meant to suggest the kind of smooth, mellow music that early yuppies likely enjoyed while sipping champagne and snorting cocaine on their yachts." This sounds like ...

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Patrick Cornelius: This Should Be Fun

Read "This Should Be Fun" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

This Should Be Fun occupies middle ground between the various modes of experimentation that infuse present-day jazz, and a fealty to traditional practices. Alto saxophonist Patrick Cornelius and an exceptional band of peers haven't completely abandoned twentieth century jazz orthodoxy, yet their work doesn't flaunt or reference specific, easily recognizable influences. If you're looking for song quotes in the midst of solos, wish to explore the relation of Cornelius' compositions to those by canonized composers, or need to match the ...

ALBUM REVIEWS

Federico Ughi: Transoceanico

Read "Transoceanico" reviewed by Patrick Burnette

Dozens of jazz albums modeled on trumpeter Miles Davis's Miles Smiles (Columbia, 1966) or saxophonist John Coltrane's Crescent (Impulse!, 1964) get released each year, but a record reminiscent of Albert Ayler's Spiritual Unity (ESP-Disc, 1964) is less common. Drummer Federico Ughi's Transoceanico nods vigorously in Ayler's direction, even as it marks Ughi's twentieth anniversary as a leader. As part of the celebration, Transoceanico features saxophonist Rachel Musson, who also appeared on Ughi's debut release. Bassist Adam Lane rounds out the ...