Jazz Articles

Daily articles including interviews, profiles, live reviews, film reviews and more... all carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. You can find more articles by searching our website, see what's trending on our popular articles page or read articles ahead of their published dates on our future articles page.

1

Album Review

Yves Léveillé: L’Échelle du Temps

Read "L’Échelle du Temps" reviewed by Troy Dostert


Although he has yet to achieve substantial acclaim beyond his native Canada, Montreal-based pianist Yves Léveillé has made an accomplished series of albums going back to 1999 with Signal Commun, the first of several releases on Effendi Records. Léveillé's music possesses a strong jazz vocabulary, but the pianist also has an abiding classical temperament. A disc like Phare (Effendi, 2019) offers excellent post-bop jazz, utilizing a conventional quintet. But on L'Échelle du Temps, it's the classical spirit that prevails, with ...

6

Album Review

JazzLab Orchestra: Loguslabusmuzikus

Read "Loguslabusmuzikus" reviewed by Chris M. Slawecki


Jazzlab Orchestra has been a fixture on the jazz scene in Canada for nearly two decades. Their unique heavy sound features six brass and reed players with a relatively standard piano, bass and drum rhythm section, and they've captured that sound on several standalone recordings and presented it on more than 300 concert stages across North America and Europe. The music on Loguslabusmuzikus, nine new pieces written by bassist Auguste Le Prez under the subtitle “The New Experience: ...

17

Album Review

Jazzlab Orchestra: Loguslabusmuzikus

Read "Loguslabusmuzikus" reviewed by Jack Bowers


The Jazzlab Orchestra, formed in 2004 and based in Montreal, Canada, lies somewhere short of orchestra-size. It's actually an octet—but don't let that deter you; the unison passages are generally robust and pleasing. Jazzlab does play jazz of a sort, music that may best be described as contemporary cerebral. In other words, this is not akin to the Dave Pell or Marty Paich octets; it's more along the lines of Gunther Schuller, Jan Garbarek or William Russo. But even though ...

6

Album Review

Francois Bourassa: L'Impact du Silence

Read "L'Impact du Silence" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan


Solo piano outings often serve as a baring of the artist's soul. Montreal-based pianist Francois Bourassa does just that on his tenth album, L'impact du Silence. Influenced by the piano artistry of Chick Corea, Brad Mehldau and Bill Evans, Bourassa has concentrated on small ensemble work—trios and quartets—on his previous recordings. Bringing his classical music influences into play, he transforms the blank canvas of silence into a work of introspection, notes chosen with a solemn deliberation which allows the open ...

4

Album Review

Pierre Labbe Sextet: Tromper Eustache

Read "Tromper Eustache" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan


Saxophonist Pierre Labbe's Tromper Eusatchesounds as if it was written for a full orchestra, or a heavy metal rock band. He employs a sextet--two saxophones, guitar/piano/bass drums-for a dark, foreboding sound, with dense, near, drone textures on the opener, “Inquie Ouie." “Soup Au Lait" ups the ante on that atmosphere, guitar wailing over a thick, trudging bass/drum beat, saxophones weaving a gritty texture behind it. Then the guitar lays back and a searing sax solo ensues. It's a ...

3

Album Review

Samuel Blais/David Liebman: Cycling

Read "Cycling" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky


There's no accounting for how great music comes together on record. Sometimes everything is meticulously laid out for months or years in advance, as artists use planning and implementation to their advantage in the creative process; other times, sparks just fly at spur of the moment sessions. Cycling falls into the latter category. In October of 2012, saxophonist Samuel Blais organized a quartet tour that found him working alongside three of his favorite saxophonists--David Binney, Donny McCaslin, ...

5

Album Review

John Roney: Preludes

Read "Preludes" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey


Intelligent programming in a jazz release provides its own reward in seasoning the recital contained therein with a thoughtful foundation. Canadian pianist John Roney entitles his recording Preludes and proceeds to populate the disc with exactly that, “Preludes," those brief, often standalone keyboard compositions from the Romantic era. Preludes most often feature a limited number of rhythmic and melodic motifs that recur through the piece. Important in jazz, the prelude is an improvisatory piece of music capably malleable to an ...


Engage

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.