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Steven Wilson: Montreal, Canada, November 15, 2011

Steven Wilson: Montreal, Canada, November 15, 2011
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Steven Wilson
Corona Theatre
Montreal, Canada
November 15, 2011
For many of the mid-Baby Boomer era, the gateway drug to jazz was progressive rock. That's not to suggest that the more structured and, some might say, bombastic environs of late 1960s/early 1970s groups like Yes
Yes
Yes
or Emerson, Lake & Palmer
Emerson, Lake & Palmer
Emerson, Lake & Palmer

band/orchestra
had a whole lot to do with the more spontaneous side of jazz, but there's little doubt—based on albums like King Crimson's Lizard (DGM Live, 1970), where nightmare-inducing mellotrons, and the volume and intensity of rock, were combined with freewheeling contributions from British jazzers like pianist Keith Tippett
Keith Tippett
Keith Tippett
b.1947
piano
and trombonist Nick Evans
Nick Evans
b.1947
—that the spirit, if not the exact letter, of jazz was at least part of prog's foundation.

When it comes to Steven Wilson—of Porcupine Tree, Bass Communion, No-Man and Blackfield—the Crimson reference is particularly germane to the guitarist/keyboardist/singer's sophomore solo effort, Grace For Drowning (Kscope, 2011). But he's not just a busy songwriter, performer and producer. Based on his superlative ongoing work remixing the Crimson catalog in both stereo and surround sound, in the past couple years, he's also emerged as the "go-to guy" for progressive rockers looking to give their classic material a 21st Century facelift—groups like Caravan and Jethro Tull, with at last one more big prog name in the pipeline—while contemporary groups like Opeth have drawn on his astute ears and unfailing respect for the music on the Swedish group's recent Heritage (Roadrunner, 2011).

From left: Nick Beggs, Marco Minnemann


If Grace for Drowning has any precedent it's in Lizard-era Crimson, albeit with a new-millennium perspective, and Wilson's choice of band mates for his Fall 2011 tour only made the lineage clearer. His Montreal performance at the Corona Theatre, where Wilson played to a house of approximately 800 enthusiastic fans, may have been a solo tour on a smaller scale than his Porcupine Tree tours (his last Montreal date was in front of more than 2,000 people at a larger hall in the city's Place des Arts), but with a group that included saxophonist/flautist/clarinetist Theo Travis
Theo Travis
Theo Travis

sax, tenor
, keyboardist Adam Holzman and drummer Marco Minnemann, the bandleader brought plenty of jazz cred to a powerhouse progressive rock sextet that also included bassist Nick Beggs and guitarist John Wesley, and was an eternity away from the symphonic prog of groups like Transatlantic, The Flower Kings and Agents of Mercy.

That said, the heavy sound of mellotron choirs was a signature on the set's closer, a version of Grace's 25-minute "Raider II" that managed to surpass the studio version's transcendent power. Wilson introduced the piece saying that his intention was to create something truly heavy, but that the guitars and drums of metal have, by now, been done to death, so he wanted to try something a little different. If "Raider II" shares certain structural similarities to Lizard's "The Battle of Glass Tears"—with a dark, ominously quiet opening leading to a thunderous middle section, Travis getting some serious flute and saxophone space, and a resolute coda, where guitars coast over a bass ostinato—it was by no means imitative.


From left: Steven Wilson, Theo Travis, John Wesley


Focusing on Grace for Drowning for eight of the set's thirteen songs, Wilson also drew liberally from his first solo album, 2009's Insurgentes (Kscope), opening the show (after an hour of gradually shifting rear projection imagery and droning music from Bass Communion slowly rallied the audience) with "No Twilights From the Court of the Sun." Minnemann came onstage first—behind the gauze-like curtain that remained in place for the first four songs—laying down its 21/4 pulse with four-limbed independence that seemed as natural as breathing to the young drum phenom—a perfect marriage of unfailing precision and effortlessly relaxed groove. The rest of the group entered, one at a time—Beggs working the repetitive bass line, Holzman adding ring-modulated electric piano, Travis some flute and Wesley a series of jagged lines—until Wilson appeared, wandering the stage and encouraging/directing the group before taking to the microphone as the group coalesced around him and cranked things up to eleven.

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