Amazon.com Widgets
821 Recommend It!

Nat Birchall: Alone In The Music

By Published: | 12,324 views
Two of the most over-used phrases in music journalism are "overnight star" and "out of nowhere," and so apologies for starting with them here. But when it comes to describing British saxophonist Nat Birchall, they have an unusual degree of exactitude. Birchall, born in 1957 in the rural seclusion of the hill country of North-West England, where he still lives in 2010, and a saxophonist since 1979, didn't make an impression on Britain's national jazz scene until 2009, when he released his second album, Akhenaten, on fellow Lancastrian, trumpeter Matthew Halsall's Gondwana label.

The media embrace was immediate, and—practically overnight—Birchall and his John Coltrane
John Coltrane
John Coltrane
1926 - 1967
saxophone
and Pharoah Sanders
Pharoah Sanders
Pharoah Sanders
b.1940
saxophone
-inspired "spiritual" jazz became hot topics of conversation. 2010's follow-up album, Guiding Spirit, also on Gondwana, has raised the temperature further. Without warning, Birchall has become a name to reckon with.

Using, basically, Halsall's uniquely empathetic band—Halsall, pianist Adam Fairhall, bassist Gavin Barras and drummer Gaz Hughes—Birchall has made two of the most exquisitely soulful and lyrical albums of the new century. They reflect his love of both the Coltrane/Sanders astral jazz oeuvre, and also of the "conscious" reggae which was his original route into music. The reggae connection isn't explicit on the discs, but the spiritual reasoning which is part of its legacy is key to Birchall's outlook on life, as can be inferred from the titles he gives some of his compositions.

Birchall began playing with bands in the mid-1980s, in jazz-funk, jazz-rock and Turkish jazz-fusion outfits. In 1992, he formed his own Corner Crew group, playing a jazz-influenced hip-hop style featuring a rapper and sampling. It was, Birchall recalls, a fine band, but "it often felt like I was simply complementing the groove that was determined by the rhythm section." In 1998, he formed Sixth Sense, who released the hard bop-rooted Sixth Sense on its own, eponymous label in 1999.

A new band followed in the early noughties, but still Birchall—far away from the bigger pool of musicians centered around London—was struggling to find like-minded colleagues. "Experience has taught me that you can't get anyone to play a certain way if they don't want to, or can't feel it," says Birchall. "When it comes down to it, they are going to play what is in their hearts. So you have to wait until you find the right people to play with you in the way you'd like."

So Birchall continued, "playing in a bubble," as he puts it, "alone in the music," until meeting Matthew Halsall in early 2007. And the outpouring of love and spirituality on Akhenaten and Guiding Spirit sounds all the sweeter for the long years in the wilderness that preceded them.

All About Jazz: Let's start at the beginning. What was the first music you can remember hearing?

Nat Birchall: The first I can recall was on the radio my parents had in the kitchen. Someone singing "English Country Garden." Many years later, I heard [saxophonist] Charlie Parker
Charlie Parker
Charlie Parker
1920 - 1955
sax, alto
quote it at the end of one of his live performances. It seemed for a moment as though he was acknowledging my earliest musical memories from beyond the grave.

I didn't study music at school, but I started buying records in late 1971. Isaac Hayes
Isaac Hayes
Isaac Hayes
1942 - 2008
vocalist
' "Theme From Shaft" was the first one. Back then, most people my age in the area were either into progressive rock or soul, but something about reggae spoke to me in a way that soul or rock music didn't. I started to buy all the reggae records I could find. In the mid 1970s, I would go to Liverpool, to a specialist reggae shop in the Toxteth area, to buy tunes.

AAJ: So reggae was your first love?

NB: Oh yes—and it's still a big love. But in the mid 1970s I was into roots and dub to the exclusion of anything else. I would spend all my money on these records, and the people in the village would be like, "What the hell is that? You're weird!" Coming from the northern countryside I didn't meet too many black people until I was in my late teens, so I was a man alone in the music I was listening to. And I think maybe I've always had this thing that my music is not what the majority of people are into. I loved the music deeply, but I never thought of myself as someone who could actually be a musician.

It was reggae that got me playing saxophone. In 1979, I lent some albums to two friends who were going to take up saxophone and flute. I dug out all my records with sax and flute on them. They were mostly reggae—I had one jazz album, Coltrane's Blue Train [Blue Note, 1957]. Somehow, in the process of digging these discs out, I got a yen to learn myself, and shortly afterwards I noticed an old alto in the back of a record shop, that the guy was going to use in a window display. I persuaded him to sell it to me for £20.

Featured recording “Live In Larissa”

Live In Larissa

(2014)
Support All About Jazz Through Amazon

Weekly Giveaways

Tom Chang

Tom Chang

About | Enter

Cedar Walton

Cedar Walton

About | Enter

Sheryl Bailey

Sheryl Bailey

About | Enter

Roscoe Mitchell

Roscoe Mitchell

About | Enter

Sponsor: ECM Records | BUY NOW