All About Jazz

Home » Articles » Interviews

Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

899

Wycliffe Gordon and Jay Leonhart: Humor in Harmony

Dr. Judith Schlesinger By

Sign in to view read count
At first, über-bassist Jay Leonhart and acclaimed trombonist Wycliffe Gordon seem an unlikely pair. Visually, they look like the Anglo poet and the star linebacker; chronologically, they're at least a generation apart. But they are both immensely talented, and their personal and musical rapport transcends any other differences between them. As relaxed and amiable as the oldest of friends, they trade their superb musicianship as naturally as conversation. They also share a sense of humor that sparkles like dry champagne. Their duo combines instrumentals and vocals, originals and standards, a dash of shtick, a little patter, and some of the most entertaining and endearing scatting since Louis Armstrong. It's all collected on their first CD, This Rhythm On My Mind (Bluesback Records, 2006), where Gordon adds tuba and didgeridoo; it also includes moments of Wayne Escoffery and Harry Allen on tenor, and Jim Saporito on percussion.

AAJ caught up with the pair recently at Gordon's office in a Harlem brownstone, a cozy, comfortable space where CDs, files, Jazz at Lincoln Center posters, memorabilia, instruments, and black-and-white pictures of jazz greats stack all the way up to the antique tinned ceiling.

All About Jazz: Just checking an item on your bio, Jay. You recorded with Ozzy Osbourne?

Jay Leonhart: And the Stray Cats. I've done a lot of goofy things like that. As a studio musician in New York, one will get strange and interesting calls. It's not like I was really in the group.

Jay Leonhart
Jay Leonhart



AAJ: And Queen Latifah?

JL: Yeah, I did her jazz record. It was pretty decent, actually. I recorded with a lot of people—I don't travel with them.

AAJ: They just leave the cash on the dresser afterward?

JL: Yup: it's thanks very much, Mr. Leonhart.

AAJ: Now to this CD of yours, which—let the record show that Wycliffe is holding the CD up to the microphone.

Wycliffe Gordon: [turning it] And there's the back side...

AAJ: I was playing it on the way down in traffic, and just grinned from ear to ear.

JL: Well, we recorded it in traffic.

AAJ: To me it's pretty new, but there's actually a long tradition of music and comedy like Slim and Slam [guitarist Bulee "Slim" Galliard and bassist Slam Stewart], and that old vaudeville team of Gallagher and Shean that you mention in your song "Mr. Leonhart Mr. Gordon." So tell me how this whole thing evolved.

JL: We met because we worked a lot with [pianist] Dick Hyman over at the [92nd street] Y. It seemed that every time Dick Hyman would do a concert, Wycliffe and I were both on. So we got to enjoying each other's music, and singing and stuff, and over the years, we've threatened each other with the idea of forming a duo and doing a record together. And we kept talking about it, and finally, we put our money where our mouths were, and we decided to do it. And we had some gigs, made the record, and musically and personally it was a great deal of fun. So now we've got ourselves into it, and we're promoting the record and we're working at it, and with everything else we gotta do, this damn record is hanging over our heads, and we want to make it a success.

WG: I concur.

AAJ: Are you trying to be like Gallagher and Shean, or Slim and Slam?

JL: No. [Turning to Wycliffe] Whaddayou say?

WG: I don't think we're trying to be like them, but we're in the spirit of what they do. I mean it's good, and it's fun, and we both like things that are good and fun.

JL: I was listening a lot to to MacVouty radio [the satellite, all-Slim Galliard station]. Bass and trombone is an unusual duo, but we can pull it off with all the stuff we can do in between, with all the instruments, and messing around, and Wycliffe scat singing. We had a lot of fun filling up the empty spaces, of which there are many.

AAJ: Well, Gallagher and Shean, as far as I know, was also a dancing duo.

WG: We dance on the next CD.

Actually, I love to dance. Maybe that will be the DVD. But back to the CD—it's the communication that takes place, the talking back and forth, kind of like we're in our living room—rather than a Piece of Art, a work on the wall in a museum. It's like when Fats Waller performs: sometimes he's talking to himself; sometimes he's talking to the people. We're in the spirit of those who like to communicate with the audience, to bring the audience into the performance—it's not just music for the sake of the music, it's an event.

AAJ: And it's not the first time you've sung on a CD. On your last one [Cone's Coup (Criss Cross Jazz, 2006)], you start with "Shhhhh! The Band is Trying to Play" and end with "Hush Yo' Mouf!!" telling people to have some respect for the music. How did that come about?

WG: I was playing with a group at Dizzy's [Club Coca Cola at Lincoln Center] about a year ago, and the Bill Mays Trio was performing the late set that Saturday night after the performance. Folks were festive, and the room never came down for the trio, and they were playing great music. So Sunday morning I got up, and sat down to the piano. The words were really easy: "Shhhhhh! The band is trying to play!" And I repeat that. And "It's hard to hear over all the walkin' and talkin' and jiggin' and jawkin' and pitterpatter and chitterchatter what the cats are trying to say." One person thought the song would be offensive to folks, but I find the only people who are offended by the song are the offenders themselves.

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Related Articles

Read Dave Ledbetter: Diversity and Unity Interviews
Dave Ledbetter: Diversity and Unity
by Seton Hawkins
Published: August 15, 2018
Read Kika Sprangers: Musical Adventurer In Holland Interviews
Kika Sprangers: Musical Adventurer In Holland
by R.J. DeLuke
Published: August 14, 2018
Read Tomasz Stanko: Lyricism and Liberation Interviews
Tomasz Stanko: Lyricism and Liberation
by John Kelman
Published: July 30, 2018
Read Hal Willner's Rock 'n' Rota Interviews
Hal Willner's Rock 'n' Rota
by Ludovico Granvassu
Published: July 26, 2018
Read Making The John Coltrane Jazz Festival in High Point Interviews
Making The John Coltrane Jazz Festival in High Point
by La-Faithia White
Published: July 21, 2018
Read George Wein: A Life and Legend in Jazz Interviews
George Wein: A Life and Legend in Jazz
by Doug Hall
Published: July 19, 2018
Read "Leonardo Pavkovic: Nothing is Ordinary" Interviews Leonardo Pavkovic: Nothing is Ordinary
by Chris M. Slawecki
Published: March 16, 2018
Read "Pat Martino: In the Moment" Interviews Pat Martino: In the Moment
by Victor L. Schermer
Published: January 12, 2018
Read "Salim Washington: To Be Moved to Speak" Interviews Salim Washington: To Be Moved to Speak
by Seton Hawkins
Published: May 30, 2018
Read "Roxy Coss: Standing Out" Interviews Roxy Coss: Standing Out
by Paul Rauch
Published: October 22, 2017
Read "Sidney Hauser:  Justice and Jubilation" Interviews Sidney Hauser: Justice and Jubilation
by Paul Rauch
Published: July 17, 2018