Support All About Jazz

All About Jazz needs your help and we have a deal. Pay $20 and we'll hide those six pesky Google ads that appear on every page, plus this box and the slideout box on the right for a full year! You'll also fund website expansion.


I want to help
4

Michael Pedicin: Why Stop Now/Ubuntu

Dan Bilawsky By

Sign in to view read count Views
Michael Pedicin: Why Stop Now/Ubuntu Michael Pedicin, like many a tenor saxophonist, bows at the altar of John Coltrane. Pedicin's work in the past has frequently referenced that iconic figure through theme, spirit, sound and/or song selection, and he continues along a similar path on Why Stop Now/Ubuntu.

For his twelfth outing as a leader, Pedicin crafted a program that speaks in different musical tongues but aims to deliver a single message. Ubuntu, as a term and philosophy, is all about humanity, peace, kindness and compassion; these are the qualities that Pedicin aimed to tap into during these performances.

Funk, free-roaming thoughts, probing proclamations, peaceful notions and more mix and mingle here. Pedicin uses his working quintet to flesh out his ideas, and everybody involved seems comfortable living in each one of those stylistic skins. The album opens with "Why Stop Now," a number that starts and ends with some drive and eases into a more comfortable swing feeling in between. Next on the program is Coltrane's "Tunji," which serves as a study in solo contrasts. Pedicin taps into the spiritual intensity of the composer's work, pianist Rick Germanson takes a more straightforward-and-bluesy path, and bassist Andy Lalasis brings a mellower quality to the fore during his searching solo.

As each number finishes, something fresh and different tends to come along. "Downtown Found" finds Pedicin and company in exploratory mode, "Then I Saw You" spotlights the sensitive musical relationship between Pedicin and his frequent collaborator, guitarist Johnnie Valentino, and "Trane Stop" is a (post)modern piece with rhythmic contrast; drummer Vic Stevens shifts back and forth between a driving groove and a variant on the Purdie shuffle on that last number. "27 Up" isn't a Coltrane tune, but it sounds just like one, and "Newtown" is a peaceful threnody for the victims of that town's horrific school shooting.

The album closes with a funky re-write of Coltrane's "Song Of The Underground Railroad" followed by a contemplative solo saxophone improvisation that's, appropriately enough, called "Ubuntu." Pedicin ultimately finds his way here by following a number of paths that all lead to one place: hope.


Track Listing: Why Stop Now; Tunji; Downtown Found; Then I Saw You; Trane Stop; 27 Up; Newtown; Song Of The Underground Railroad; Ubuntu

Personnel: Michael Pedicin: tenor saxophone; Johnnie Valentino: guitar; Andy Lalasis: acoustic bass; Rick Germanson: piano, Fender Rhodes (3, 4, 8); Vic Stevens: drums.

Year Released: 2013 | Record Label: Self Produced | Style: Modern Jazz


Interviews
CD/LP/Track Review
Read more articles
Why Stop Now/Ubuntu
Why Stop Now/Ubuntu
Self Produced
2013
buy
Live @ The Loft
Live @ The Loft
Jazz Hut Records
2012
buy
Ballads...Searching For Peace
Ballads...Searching...
Self Produced
2011
buy
Everything Starts Now...
Everything Starts...
Self Produced
2007
buy
You Don't Know What Love Is
You Don't Know What...
Self Produced
1996
buy
Angles
Angles
Self Produced
1989
buy

More Articles

Post a comment

comments powered by Disqus

Join the staff. Writers Wanted!

Develop a column, write album reviews, cover live shows, or conduct interviews.