Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

462

Zoe & Idris Rahman: Where Rivers Meet

Chris May By

Sign in to view read count
The Bengali folk and film music inspired Where Rivers Meet introduces a radical and beautiful new direction for the London-based pianist Zoe Rahman and her clarinetist/saxophonist brother, Idris.



Born and brought up in Britain by a Bengali father and English mother, Zoe Rahman describes herself as culturally "very English," and her previous work has been shaped almost entirely by the American jazz tradition filtered through British sensibilities. The first sign she gave of an emerging interest in Bengali music was on her Mercury Prize-nominated album Melting Pot (Manushi, 2006), whose closing track was an arrangement of the popular Bengali song "Mucche Jaoa Dinguli." Rahman had discovered the music only three years earlier, when her father was hospitalized and she had transferred some of his worn-thin cassette tapes of 1950s Bengali music to CDs for him to listen to while he recuperated. Entranced by what she heard, she decided to catch up on her father's native culture before it was too late and he might no longer be able to share it with her.



Idris' work has been more culturally diverse, not least with his band Soothsayers, whose Tangled Roots (Red Earth Records, 2006) was a rousing celebration of Jamaican and West African music, in particular Nigerian Afrobeat.



Taking tunes introduced to Zoe and Idris in the main by their father, who contributes vocals to two tracks, Where Rivers Meet avoids neat labeling and is neither pure jazz nor standard issue world music. It's best described as chamber jazz hybridized with Bengali popular music, and is a vibrant affair packed with melodies—some joyful, others sad, all of them intensely pretty—and gorgeously lyrical improvisations.



The core of the group is a trio comprised of Zoe and Idris with tabla player Kuljit Bhamra, augmented by bassist Oli Hayhurst, drummer Gene Calderazzo and violinist Samy Bishai. Bengali guest vocalists Arnob, Gaurob and Joseph Aquilina are featured winningly on five of the twelve tracks. Zoe and Idris are the main soloists, but Bishai contributes striking violin improvisations to "Sanctuary" and "Stream Of Joy," and Bhamra a vigorous tabla workout to "You Came Like Welcome Rain."



The tunes are exquisite and include three by Bengali Nobel Laureate Rabindranath Tagore—the bittersweet "Invitation Missed" and "Stream Of Joy" and, an intriguingly close cousin to "Auld Lang Syne," the tender "Do You Wish To Forget?" At other times, particularly when Hayhurst and Calderazzo kick in, the mood is more exuberant.



Reflecting the centrality of rivers to the life of the country, Where Rivers Meet shares a similar title to Where The Rivers Meet, a luminously beautiful suite featuring Bengali singers Lucy Rahman and Akah Sultan written for the London multi-cultural big band Grand Union Orchestra by its leader, the Bengali music enthusiast Tony Haynes. The Rahmans' take on their paternal heritage is more intimate than Haynes' masterpiece, and every bit as glorious.


Track Listing: O River; Invitation Missed; Sanctuary; Betrayed; You Came Like Welcome Rain; Now You're Gone; Pilgrim's Song; Mind's Eye; Stream Of Joy; Suddenly It's Dusk Again; We'll Surely Meet Again; Do You Wish To Forget?.

Personnel: Idris Rahman: clarinet, flute, bass clarinet, vocals (7); Zoe Rahman: piano; Kuljit Bhamra: percussion; Oli Hayhurst: double bass; Gene Calderazzo: drums; Samy Bishai: violin; Arnob: vocals (4, 9); Gaurob: vocals (7, 12); Mizan Rahman: vocals (7, 8); Joseph Aquilina: lead vocal (7).

Title: Where Rivers Meet | Year Released: 2008 | Record Label: Manushi Records

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Shop Music & Tickets

Click any of the store links below and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Read Runner in the Rain CD/LP/Track Review
Runner in the Rain
by Troy Dostert
Published: December 15, 2018
Read Cuarteto Europa CD/LP/Track Review
Cuarteto Europa
by Mark Sullivan
Published: December 15, 2018
Read Chicago/Buenos Aires Connections CD/LP/Track Review
Chicago/Buenos Aires Connections
by Chris Mosey
Published: December 15, 2018
Read Beggar’s Banquet 50th Anniversary Edition CD/LP/Track Review
Beggar’s Banquet 50th Anniversary Edition
by C. Michael Bailey
Published: December 15, 2018
Read Intelsat CD/LP/Track Review
Intelsat
by Glenn Astarita
Published: December 15, 2018
Read World Gardens CD/LP/Track Review
World Gardens
by Dan McClenaghan
Published: December 14, 2018
Read "Lab 2018/The Rhythm Of The Road" CD/LP/Track Review Lab 2018/The Rhythm Of The Road
by Chris Mosey
Published: September 11, 2018
Read "Roppongi" CD/LP/Track Review Roppongi
by Mark Sullivan
Published: January 19, 2018
Read "Moments Before" CD/LP/Track Review Moments Before
by Jakob Baekgaard
Published: September 22, 2018
Read "Tasty Tunes" CD/LP/Track Review Tasty Tunes
by Jack Bowers
Published: February 11, 2018
Read "Vol.2" CD/LP/Track Review Vol.2
by Mike Jurkovic
Published: June 28, 2018
Read "Brothers" CD/LP/Track Review Brothers
by Dan Bilawsky
Published: September 24, 2018