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West Africa: Frikyiwa's Mix of Ancient and Modern

AAJ Staff By

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When you've heard (and seen) enough music, you get pretty good at judging a CD by the cover. Sure, the process incurs a lot of failure along the way, but its successes can be dramatic. Such was the case with the tiny French label known as Frikyiwa, which I first encountered in an overflowing bin at my local indie record store. The photography, colors, and design of two records caught my eye, and the obvious references to West African tradition seemed likely to catch my ear, so I bit on one.

The cover of Siran reveals a smiling musician known as Filifin, bright red and blue n'goni (a lute-like instrument) balanced in one hand, baby blue motorbike steadied in the other: obviously practical transportation for a real life musician. The back side had the same bike, the musician out of the picture but a passerby moving through with a plate of bright-colored fruit. But Filifin looked like he had it going on. Sold.

On the train home I broke open the plastic and discovered the cardboard cover was also the case, unfolding piece by piece into a two-sided, nine-panel photo collage with a disc tucked all the way in the bottom. It was like peeling layers from a large fruit: each fold had something unexpected to offer and the centerpiece was the seed. At home I learned that Filifin and his primary accompanist, N'Gou Bagayoko, are both accomplished string players from Mali. They sound perfectly at home in the ancient Manden music tradition, which dates back through centuries of father-son transmission.

The packaging was the most beautiful and natural thing I had ever encountered in unwrapping thousands of CDs. Fortunately the music was not far beyond. That may sound like feckless exaggeration, but in all honesty Siran was one of the biggest musical discoveries of my life. It was followed by a rapid acquisition of the entire Frikyiwa catalog. Enough said.

Frikyiwa is the brainchild of French musician/producer Frédéric Galliano, who has put his own stamp on the electronic music world. He recently released Frédéric Galliano & The African Divas (Plas America, 2002), brought to fruition after four years recording around West Africa with over fifty local singers and musicians.

But Frikyiwa, born in 1998, is a truly collaborative project. The official maiden voyage of the FKW series came in the form of Manding-Ko, a thoroughly traditional project by Hadja Kouyaté and Ali Boulo Santo, most prominently consisting of traditional kora and vocals. In interceding years, Frikyiwa has expanded to include more traditional music, two organic/ambient electronic productions, a broad sampler, and a set of varied remixes with worldwide participation. Several of these releases offer creative interactive multimedia CD-ROM presentations as well. (Visit randombias.com for the best example on the web, including sound samples.)

In this article I will review the entire Frikyiwa catalog to date—or at least the current extent of the full-length FKW series, the best I can tell—touching briefly on highlights which have set it apart along the way. From ancient past to modern future, the label has a little of it all... and, fortunately for us, these recordings bear the stamp of modern production.

Visit Frikyiwa and Frédéric Galliano on the web. (Note: the Frikyiwa site has been under construction for some time, but its architects confirm that it should be up and running later in April, with lots of bells and whistles.)

European distribution for Frikyiwa is handled by Nocturne (France).

For American availability visit Studio Distribution on the web.


Index of reviews:

FKW001: Hadja Kouyate & Ali Boulo Santo: Manding-Ko
FKW002: Lipitone: Nuits Sur Ecoute: Bougouni
FKW006: Filifin: Siran
FKW007: N'Gou Bagayoko: Kulu *
FKW010: Louis 2000: Nuits Sur Écoute: Bignona
FKW011: Diefadima Kanté: Frankonodou
FKW012: Various Artists: Frikyiwa: La Musique des Maquis *
FKW016: Frikyiwa Presents Electronic Experiences in African Music
(* = recommended for the novice)



Hadja Kouyate & Ali Boulo Santo
Manding-Ko
FKW001 (2001)

Origin: Senegal/Guinea
Summary: Stripped-down kora with female voice

The first record in the catalog was recorded in Dakar, Senegal by Galliano with fellow DJ/producer Jeff Sharel. It features thirty year-old vocalist Hadja Kouyaté, a beautiful young lady whose incredibly detailed yellow dress decorates a third of the package's photographic packaging. She is accompaned by Ali Boulo Santo (aka Dieruorou Cissoko)'s voice and kora, with a number of other musicians mostly popping in for the 12-plus minute jam "Bakari."

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