Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

726

Vision Festival 2010: Day 4, June 26, 2010

John Sharpe By

Sign in to view read count
Prologue | Day 1 | Day 2 | Day 3 | Day 4 | Day 5 | Day 6 | Day 7
Areni Agbabian, Lorenzo Sanguedolce, Go-Zee-Lah Reggie Nicholson, Borah Bergman, Ned Rothenberg Mark Helias, Tony Malaby, Charles Gayle
Vision Festival
Abrons Arts Center

New York City

June 26, 2010

Saturday was a long day at the Vision Festival, starting in the afternoon with a series of shows by relative newcomers in the Emerging Artists segment and then, after a brief hiatus, continuing with a full night's program. For those with the appetite, between those times there was also a talk by Amiri Baraka on Corporate Control of the Arts in the downstairs theater, before an audience of festival-goers and musicians. One of the pleasures of a festival is the chance to pick up on new names alongside the established stars, but as always the auditorium was sparsely populated for the afternoon shows, though the real diehards were there, supplemented by friends and supporters.

R & E

First up was R & E, featuring vocalist Areni Agbabian, augmented with subtle electronics abetted by Tony Malaby on tenor and soprano sax plus Quasim Naqvi on drums. Agbabian's experimental, wordless vocals blended well with Malaby's measured distortions, though on occasion she applied the electronics to effect an ethereal choir against which she span further exclamations. Notwithstanding Malaby's inventive counterpoint, Agbabian's voice remained the primary focus, with the clattering free percussion in a supportive role, for a set of shifting atmospheric sound exploration. Agbabian packed an impressive voice for such a slight framed young women, employing power in abundance when needed. The highlight came late in the set as Malaby built to a climax of choked shrieks on tenor, supported by vocal squawks and drum explosions, which threw some of the previous more subdued passages into intense relief.

Lorenzo Sanguedolce Quartet

Brooklyn based tenor saxophonist Lorenzo Sanguedolce enlisted three seasoned practitioners to perform his unfettered, open, not unmelodic brand of improv, often in-tempo even, in a set which simmered hard but never boiled over. His tenor was slinky and sensual with a bright airy tone, colored by restrained multiphonics and dissonances On piano, David Arner contributed some punchy free moments, deploying a fast stabbing action simultaneously at both extremes of the keyboard, while Francois Grillot proved solid on bass, whether sounding ringing harmonics and lush arco, or a throbbing pedal point to anchor rubato stasis. Arner attended the saxophonist closely, variously following, echoing and underpinning his lead. A tender then playful tenor soliloquy from Sanguedolce showed his potential in a set that won some enthusiastic support.

Go-Zee-Lah

Fronted by the captivating Kyoko Kitamura, Go-Zee-Lah gave one of the Festival's most theatrical performances, though pianist Yayoi Ikawa was generally lost in a mane of hair hanging over her keyboard. Drummer Harris Eisenstadt brandishing his sticks demonstratively, very elegantly kept innovative time. Spirited group interplay meant they covered a lot of ground in their 40-minute set, with pieces ranging from Japanese children's' songs, an alphabet song (made up as no Japanese version exists), and the alienation of being American and Japanese, but not feeling truly either, in which Kitamura sampled speech from her laptop, which she echoed and commented upon.

Kitamura acted as the focal point, introducing the tunes, and moving between torch singing, sprechgesang (an expressionistic technique halfway between singing and speaking) and vocal aerobatics in her accomplished delivery. While Eisenstadt extracted great tonal variation from his kit, for example using his sticks or mallets to modulate the pitch as he struck his drums, it was always integrated within the flow of the music. The diminutive Ikawa breezed from romantic to incandescent, though she had to virtually stand to discharge her pent up energy in an explosion of keys.

Reggie Nicholson Percussion Concept

For the first set of the evening, AACM drummer/composer Reggie Nicholson had a whole posse of people to whom he wished to pay homage: he dedicated his performance to Fred Anderson, Rashied Ali, Steve McCall and Wilber Morris. Befitting the title, the stage looked like the percussion department of a music store, containing instruments sufficient for three percussionists, and reedman Salim Washington, who also doubled on percussion. Even though there was so much firepower on standby, Nicholson adroitly marshaled his resources so that there was always room for everyone to be heard.

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Shop

Start your shopping here and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Live Reviews
The 2019 Tibet House U.S. Benefit Concert
By Mike Perciaccante
February 17, 2019
Live Reviews
JAZZTOPAD 2018
By Henning Bolte
February 16, 2019
Live Reviews
America At The Paramount
By Mike Perciaccante
February 16, 2019
Live Reviews
Brussels Jazz Festival 2019
By Martin Longley
February 15, 2019
Live Reviews
Gourmet At April Jazz Club
By Anthony Shaw
February 13, 2019
Live Reviews
Terri Lyne Carrington and Social Science at Cologne Philharmonic
By Phillip Woolever
February 12, 2019
Live Reviews
Quentin Baxter Quintet At The Jazz Corner
By Martin McFie
February 12, 2019