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Undead Music Festival, Greenwich Village Edition: New York, NY, May 9, 2012

Daniel Lehner By

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Undead Music Festival
Greenwich Village Edition
Kenny's Castways, Sullivan Hall and Le Poisson Rouge
New York, NY

May 9th, 2012

Despite its constant and ambitious expansion into other geographic and spatial situations, the Undead Music Festival (formally the Undead Jazz Festival, a change that says more than a bit about the nature of the music and music scene) has retained the tradition of keeping its first night at the Greenwich Village trifecta of Kenny's Castaways, Le Poisson Rouge and Sullivan Hall. The festival moved its date up considerably from its usual time—and perhaps as a result of the end-of-school obligations of the majority of Undead's fan base, the turnout seemed more meager than usual. Still, those who came out were enthusiastic to watch and absorb the new acts and returning favorites, well into the evening.

Secret Architecture

Formed in Boston and honed in New York's Caffe Vivaldi on a regular basis for the past year, Secret Architecture made its first break into the New York festival run at Kenny's Castaways. The young, trans-national band proved itself to be a strong new addition in the pantheon of (mostly) acoustic jazz bands influenced by indie rock and chiefly interested in operating as a unit. Much of their music had a mysterious but optimistic quality in which lilting, almost cabaret-style rhythms gave way to energetic rock sections. Secret Architecture's playful seriousness seemed to draw from two directions: the historicist melodies of Ornette Coleman and the mature, knowledgeable fusion of bands like Radiohead. Their music put a new twist on the tried-but-increasingly-clichéd notion of "episodic," wherein they would end with a similar but different melody from where they started, ending with more of an ellipsis or a question mark than a period.

Being Berklee graduates, it's a given that the individual musicians would all fit the pre-requisite of "killin,' " but what's more important is that they're unique. Scottish saxophonist Fraser Campbell is probably one of the few young saxophonists to truly adapt the language of Charles Lloyd, a style that combines enriched bebop lines with skittering arpeggios and long, sinewy threads of passionate sound. Julian Smith's bass lines and solos achieved both virtuosic verbosity and hard-edged punchiness with dazzling technique and a potent, woody sound. Drummer Zach Mangan not only played a super-funky samba, but he also made jazz and pop collide in instances where he mixed a swinging ride with a thumping bass kick, and keyboardist Wade Ridenhour impressively developed gradually more fluid ideas over the 3/8 chord cycles of their penultimate tune.

Jamie Saft's New Zion Trio

Jamie Saft's band did not begin its set with any pretensions. Right from the get-go, the trio dropped right into dub reggae mechanics, with bassist John Maron and drummer Craig Santiago locked into an airtight, failsafe one-drop groove. Saft's trio drew bits and pieces from jazz and Jewish music, but wasn't overly eager to insert them willy-nilly. Instead, he preferred his occasional harmonic fluctuations to flit in and out of his majestic piano waves as he split his time between echoed piano and Rhodes, playing both with similar linguistic qualities, but attuning his playing to the difference in sonic quality. He also indulged in some space-commander type sound control, matching up nicely with Santiago echo chamber grooves. Saft, known for his work with John Zorn, did inject a bit of Masada-style Hebraic tonalities, but only as a tension-building device, which was slowly-but-triumphantly brought to a huge resolution to close New Zion Trio's set.

Nate Wooley Quintet

Last year, Nate Wooley, bassist Eivind Opsvik and drummer Harris Eisenstadt took the same Kenny's Castaways stage under Eisenstadt's name (along with Chris Dingman on vibraphone and Matt Bauder on tenor sax). However, this configuration, with Matt Moran on vibes this time and Josh Sinton on bass clarinet, championed Wooley's particular compositional and improvisational outlook. Whereas in Eisenstadt's group, Wooley was the more agitated, sonically textured counterpart to Bauder's streamlined sound, Wooley and Sinton were more evenly paired, even allowing Wooley to be the more Apollonian one. On Wooley's "Make Your Friend Feel Low" for example, Wooley's solo was unabashedly linguistic in terms of bebop vocabulary a la Lee Morgan or Woody Shaw, whereas Sinton took a more Eric Dolphy-esque route (and not just due to the same instrument—he also managed to capture some of Dolphy's patented, twisted take on typical bop phrasing). On Wooley's "Plow" however, the two were more in tandem, Sinton's lower textures buoying Wooley's fluttering.

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