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Travis Sullivan: This Cat Plays the Sax

R.J. DeLuke By

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Travis Sullivan composes and arranges with a fine flair. For about the last six years, he's proven himself a strong leader of a large band, running the Bjorkestra, an acclaimed unit that plays slick, intricate and sometimes burning jazz versions of songs by popular Icelandic singer/songwriter Bjork.

It's a band that's an audience pleaser and one that musicians like to play in. In Milan, Italy, in December, trumpeter Dave Douglas was the guest soloist. "That's a really fun group," says Lauren Sevian, who has played baritone sax in the group (a chair she also holds in the Mingus Big Band). "The music is so cool—Bjork music for big band. It's unbelievable. Travis Sullivan does a great job. Most of the arrangements are his. The musicians are all so incredible."

Sullivan also working on special music to commemorate the upcoming 10th anniversary of the 9/11 World Trade Center tragedy in New York City.

So, if you ask some people, he's a big band leader who's adept in that arena. And they're right, sort of. If you ask Sullivan, he's an alto saxophonist who enjoys the challenge and adventurous interplay of small groups, and loves to improvise on his on his axe. His latest recording, New Directions, released in May, 2011 on Posi-Tone, attests to that. It's a quartet that exhibits an alto player of strength, dexterity and imagination; it burns with a sympathetic and cooking rhythm section. It may come as a surprise to people who followed Sullivan's work since coming out of the Manhattan School of Music. But it probably shouldn't be. This cat is a player.

"It was time to start focusing on my own music and playing. That's where my heart first and foremost lies," he says, eagerly looking forward to the CD release. The title sums up those feelings and the fact that he'd like to focus more on his playing. "I definitely wanted to sort of make a statement about that. It's a new direction based on events of the last six or seven years."

"I consider myself, first and foremost, an improviser—a composer, second," explains Sullivan. "One of my role models is someone like Wayne Shorter, where the composition and the improvisation try to integrate themselves into one whole. But when I created the Bjorkestra, it was always with the intention of creating a context for improvisation with her music, within a big band context. In theory, that's great. It works. But I'm also a very democratic bandleader. When we perform, I try to spread the wealth very evenly in terms of solos. It makes it more accessible for an audience to hear over the course of an evening. Several horn players play, the different personalities and everything, rather than just one main soloist. The consequence is that I would only get to blow maybe one, possibly two, solos a night."

The Bjork book is also primarily modal, so chord changes and similar attributes were not usually employed. "The improvisation side of things wasn't always necessarily that challenging for me, in terms of what I practice, what I've studied and everything. So there was a part of my artistic expression that was put aside for the sake of performing this music," says Sullivan.

"Where I draw most of my inspiration from is from jazz, and what I practice is definitely jazz. I transcribe a lot of artists, study the work of a lot of artists that are considered jazz artists. So I would like to think of myself as being a jazz guy. I think that with the Bjorkestra, it was questionable for a lot of people whether this music can really be considered jazz or not. I feel like it is. Jazz, for me, is taking and interpreting the best music of what's going on right now—Bjork was an example of that—and making it one's own: reinterpreting it, contextualizing it for improvisation. I really consider myself an improviser. That's an integral part of jazz."

Sullivan is joined on the record by Mike Eckroth on piano, Marco Panascia on bass and Brian Fishler on drums. The tunes, eight of ten originals, have different feels, but are all in the jazz realm. They find Sullivan with expressive swagger at times, and at other times with a more smooth, peaceful, but probing mode. Everyone in the rhythm section is on top of things, supportive, creative, and tight. "Tuneology" is the closest to hard bop, and the band gives a fine accounting on that front. "Autumn in New Hampshire" (Sullivan hails from there) is a ballad that shows how Sullivan can wring emotion from a nice melody.

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Jamia's Dance

Jamia's Dance

Travis Sullivan
New Directions

CD/LP/Track Review
Interviews
CD/LP/Track Review
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Melodien

Melodien

Unit Records
2014

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I Go Humble

I Go Humble

Zoho Music
2013

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New Directions

New Directions

Posi-Tone Records
2011

buy
As We Speak

As We Speak

Self Produced
2001

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