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Todd Neufeld: Transcending the Limits of Sound

Jakob Baekgaard By

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My approach as a musician is a largely metaphorical one. I've felt very connected to certain literature, to certain filmmakers like Abbas Kiarostami and Carl Dreyer, to artists, to the asymmetrical shapes of the natural world. —Todd Neufeld
Originality is a hard concept to pin down, but in music, it is a matter of having your own sound. The idea of a singular signature has been a part of the narrative of jazz for a long time, and it forms the basis of the so-called blindfold test where musicians try to recognize the voice of fellow musicians.

New York-based guitarist and composer, Todd Neufeld, would be a strong candidate for a blindfold test. His sound is so unique that it is immediately recognizable. The way he shapes the lines of his instrument reveals an artist in pursuit of a sound that transgresses instrumental boundaries, but it is also a sound that continually feeds off the rich tradition of jazz. For instance, Neufeld gladly acknowledges the influence of pioneering guitarist Charlie Christian.

Neufeld is influenced by the past, but also helps shaping the future of jazz. He is a guitar teacher and is in dialog with a new generation of musicians. He is also a vital part of the record label Ruweh Records, which has released intriguing albums by singer and pianist, Rema Hasumi, bassist Raphael Malfliet and percussionist Sergio Krakowski.

In spite of a pressed schedule due to his many activities, Neufeld generously took his time to answer questions about his life as a musician, the influence of late pianist Masabumi Kikuchi and his new album Mu'U.

All About Jazz: I've heard that it was a record by the famed jazz guitarist Charlie Christian that really got you into hearing jazz. Could you tell about the experience of hearing him, and how your taste in jazz has developed since then?

Todd Neufeld: The experience was simple and magical. I was a 13 year old child who listened to Charlie Christian's Live at Minton's recordings repeatedly, for days on end. There was no reason in my life for me to be doing this. The music had a magic, and I was deeply drawn to it. While now I can isolate it's elements, I am very pleased that my connection to the music started with this very strong and pure attraction. Even though analysis is often the job of the musician, I always make sure the connection beneath it is that unknowable attraction.

AJJ: Did you grow up in a home with a lot of music and did you realize early on that you wanted to play music yourself?

TN: No, I grew up in a home with not much more music than the usual American suburban middle class home. Though they certainly had their creative energies, my father was an immigrant, and my mother from a family of recent immigrants, and their life seemed to be more about setting up a comfortable life for their children.

At a certain phase in those teenage years, my fascination with the music completely took hold. My first teacher, John Quara, was a very soulful and warm musician with his own very real participation in the tradition of the music. Over those early years influences started to appear in my life that tethered me, without me knowing it, to the mythologies and the path of this music. That transformation happened and my mind simply observed it at some point after it had occurred.

AAJ: You have studied both literature and music. Could you tell a bit more about your formal musical education? I would also like to know whether literature still influences your work and the way you think about art.

TN: I studied for several years with John Quara, a student himself of Lennie Tristano, and a great player. Just being in those lessons and hearing him play that blonde L-5, hearing the real thing before me at such an early age created many sleepless nights. After that Joe Giglio helped me organize my approach and filled in many gaps in my knowledge.

At 18 I went to NYU, but I wasn't going to study music in school. The first two years I studied Literature, then I transferred to the music department and finished there with a major in music performance, whatever that means. I met some great people, students and teachers, but I consider the knowledge I acquired there quite inadequate. Thankfully, I was introduced to topics like western counterpoint, which became a further interest down the line. I also benefited from two years of study with Bruce Arnold, who's codified pedagogy was at the time a breathe of fresh air.

The formal schooling happened after my love of the music was very deeply ingrained. So, while it was a slight modulation of my focus, thankfully what interested me in the music was much stronger than anything that school could infringe on too much.


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