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The Solo Recordings of Ari Hoenig

David A. Orthmann By

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As evidenced by his two solo recordings, Time Travels (1K Recordings) and The Life Of A Day (Ah Ha Records), Ari Hoenig is an unusually resourceful artist who transcends the limitations of working with a conventional four-piece drum kit and a few cymbals. Introducing a system of replicating the exact pitches of melodies, Hoenig plays a cornucopia of songs, ranging from jazz standards ("Caravan," "Oleo," "Night In Tunisia") to less-than-fashionable ditties ("Pop Goes The Weasel," "Reveille," "I've Been Workin' On The Railroad"), and integrates improvisations that often quote from the themes. The discs' 36 tracks include a number of Hoenig's original compositions and extemporaneous solos as well. The drumming is vivid and imaginative, yet invariably logical and precisely executed. Even when juggling a number of ideas, there's always a sense of order and structural integrity in everything he plays.

Hoenig takes the melody to Thelonious Monk's "I Mean You" ( Time Travels ) at a sprightly pace, employing single strokes to the snare drum (snares off) and both tom-toms. Some strokes are allowed to ring; others are cut short. The second time through the 8 bar "A" section the light clap of the hi-hat cymbals on beats 2 and 4 undergird the drums and locks in a steady pulse. During the bridge Hoenig's sticking turns skittish as he uses buzz strokes to make an irregular, crunching sound, as well as a closed roll which produces a somewhat smoother rumble; he then returns to singles for a last go at the "A" section. Hoenig drags out the tune's 4 bar conclusion just a bit, temporarily suspending the swinging feeling by dropping the steady hi-hat and emitting a kind of flailing chatter.

A couple of rim shots announce the beginning of Hoenig's acrobatic improvisation. His solo constantly evolves as he rapidly works through a string of brief ideas, always maintaining narrative continuity. (If your attention briefly wanders, when you return he's miles away.) Hoenig thinks very quickly and his execution is always clean. Nothing comes off as flatfooted, labored, or overextended. He never resorts to executing a cliché in order to buy time and figure out what to do next. Sometimes he'll interrupt the aggressively swinging presentation with something that sounds like someone rapidly running up and down a flight of stairs, without losing the solo's overall momentum. On a couple of occasions Hoenig repeats a phrase often enough until it becomes familiar then briskly dashes off to something else.


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