Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

2

Noah Howard Quartet: The Bremen Concert

Jerry D'Souza By

Sign in to view read count
Alto saxophonist Noah Howard was a key player in the free jazz movement of the 1960s. He moved into the realm of that decade—a time when the atmosphere was rife with saxophonists primed to the calling. Born in New Orleans, Howard characterized his approach with a distinctive sensibility for gospel music that unraveled enticingly in his explorations. His improvisations revolved on the turnstiles of a ripe imagination, and it was no surprise, then, that his first record as a leader, Noah Howard Quartet (1965) was for the avant-garde ESP Disk label. After Noah Howard at Judson Hall (ESP Disk) the following year, Howard went on to play with several free jazz heavyweights including saxophonist Archie Shepp, pianist Misha Mengelberg and drummer Sunny Murray.

Howard was a man of many parts: he travelled extensively, working with poets and musicians in India, Africa and Europe; after living in Paris, Brussels and Nairobi, he returned to the USA, recording extensively and playing several concert dates. A live radio broadcast in Bremen, Germany on January 1, 1975 now sees the light of day, thanks to Jan Ström, who aims to support the participating artists with the proceeds of this CD-R.

Even as he stamped his presence as an exponent of free movement, Howard never forsook melody. "Olé Negro" is right up front, captivating with an irresistible musical loop that sways and beckons. Howard keeps his tone light and agile before turning hard into invention as corkscrew phrases replace sweet intonation. His easy essaying of structure and improvisation is absorbing and heady. He is well met by pianist Kakashi Kako who sustains the momentum with flowing excursions and a hard-driving rhythm section that help elevate this to a high plateau.

"New Arrival" is a lovely ballad that basks in the glow of Howard's alto—that is, until Kako stirs the pulse with a clasp of notes that dovetail and churn. The complexity is made manifest in the center as Howard returns to play with compelling majesty.

This CD is a worthy addition, not only to Howard's discography, but to the catalogue of all excellent jazz as well.

Track Listing: Ole Negro; Pearl Stream; New Arrival; Ziki.

Personnel: Noah Howard: alto saxophone; Kakashi Kako: piano; Kent Carter: bass; Oliver Johnson: drums.

Title: The Bremen Concert | Year Released: 2012 | Record Label: Jazt Tapes

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Shop for Music

Start your music shopping from All About Jazz and you'll support us in the process. Learn how.

Album Reviews
Profiles
Album Reviews
Read more articles
The Bremen Concert

The Bremen Concert

Jazt Tapes
2012

buy
The Black Ark

The Black Ark

Bo'Weavil
2008

buy
 

At Documenta IX

Boxholder Records
2002

buy
 

Red Star

Boxholder Records
2001

buy

Related Articles

Read Nexus Album Reviews
Nexus
By Jakob Baekgaard
May 23, 2019
Read The Second Coming Album Reviews
The Second Coming
By Daniel Barbiero
May 23, 2019
Read Luminária Album Reviews
Luminária
By John Sharpe
May 23, 2019
Read Jazz Band/Rock Band/Dance Band Album Reviews
Jazz Band/Rock Band/Dance Band
By Jerome Wilson
May 23, 2019
Read When Will The Blues Leave Album Reviews
When Will The Blues Leave
By Karl Ackermann
May 22, 2019
Read Crowded Heart Album Reviews
Crowded Heart
By Dan Bilawsky
May 22, 2019
Read Infinite Itinerant Album Reviews
Infinite Itinerant
By Geno Thackara
May 22, 2019