Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

5

Nate Radley: The Big Eyes

Dan McClenaghan By

Sign in to view read count
Guitarist Nate Radley has turned in some great sideman performances. On alto saxophonist Loren Stillman's Winter Fruits (Pirouet, 2009), he teamed with organist Gary Versace and drummer Ted Poor for one of that year's more unusual—and unusually fine—recordings; and in 2010, he joined another intrepid saxophonist, Marc Mommaas, on the modernistic Landmarc, a string-heavy set with fellow guitar slingers Vic Juris, and Rez Abbasi.

The Big Eyes finds Radley debuting in the leader's chair, serving up out an original and forward-looking sound. The set of all original material opens with "Boo," an eerie, medium-heat cooker featuring the guitarist's Winter Fruits employer, Stillman, on alto sax. The mood is atmospheric, gloomy and introspective, carrying over to "January." Stillman's approach is consistently understated, with a smoldering intensity as he moves in a quartet mode, with Fender Rhodes, bass and drums, on "Ascent." Here, and throughout this compelling disc, there's a sense of potential power reigned in for the purposes of exploring the crags and crevasses of Radley's thoughtful compositions.

"Silver Lining" shines brighter than the rest of the set, Radley sending out glowing chords in front of Poor's mischievous jumble of percussion, while "Archipelago" has a pastoral and pensive feeling, leading into the title tune and the disc's highlight, featuring Stillman whispering on alto sax around Radley's nuanced, singe-note ruminations. "Wise River" finds Radley working in trio format with bass and drums, the music flowing at a deliberate and contemplative pace. The tune has a modern folksiness, not unlike some of guitarist Bill Frisell's work.

With The Big Eyes, Radley's move from sideman to leader is an excellent introduction to a rising jazz talent.

Track Listing: Boo, January; Ascent; Silver Lining; Archipelago; The Big Eyes; Wise River; Blue Square; All That's Solid.

Personnel: Nate Radley: guitar; Loren Stillman: alto saxophone; Pete Rende: Fender Rhodes; Matt Pavolka: bass; Ted Poor: drums.

Title: The Big Eyes | Year Released: 2012 | Record Label: Fresh Sound New Talent

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Album Reviews
Read more articles
Morphoses

Morphoses

Fresh Sound New Talent
2015

buy
The Big Eyes

The Big Eyes

Fresh Sound New Talent
2012

buy

Upcoming Shows

Date Detail Price
Jan27Sun
Mike Neer
Barbes
Brooklyn, NY

Shop

Start your shopping here and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Read Kresten Osgood Quintet Plays Jazz Album Reviews
Kresten Osgood Quintet Plays Jazz
By Dan McClenaghan
January 21, 2019
Read The Poetry of Jazz Volume Two Album Reviews
The Poetry of Jazz Volume Two
By Victor L. Schermer
January 21, 2019
Read Mesophase Album Reviews
Mesophase
By Glenn Astarita
January 21, 2019
Read Rasif Album Reviews
Rasif
By Chris M. Slawecki
January 21, 2019
Read Live at the Black Musicians' Conference, 1981 Album Reviews
Live at the Black Musicians' Conference, 1981
By John Sharpe
January 20, 2019
Read More Than One Thing Album Reviews
More Than One Thing
By Gareth Thompson
January 20, 2019
Read Wandering Monster Album Reviews
Wandering Monster
By Roger Farbey
January 20, 2019