All About Jazz

Home » Articles » CD/LP/Track Review

7

Hanuman: Soundhousing

Glenn Astarita By

Sign in to view read count
Hailing from Italy, The Hanuman Quartet's gospel professes a far- reaching and multicolored plane of concepts, including hummable themes, investigative dialogues and asymmetrical pulses that pose a slight realm of suspense on a per-track basis. Many of the semi-structured compositional attributes contain an open forum for improvisation amid nimble atmospherics, simmering free-jazz opuses and a little roughhousing along the way.

The band integrates numerous metrics into its manifesto. For instance on "Bhurma Dreams," bassist Stefano Solani's loping blues pattern offers a compact base for the hornist's abstract expressionism and splintered decomposition efforts. Here and throughout, the soloists manage to streamline these works with airy overtones, tendering a nice balance between conventional jazz articulations and the free-zone. Moreover, they strike a symmetrical perspective by fusing lighthearted choruses with scrappy and rambunctious rhythmic jaunts.

Clarinetist Fabio Martini tiptoes through dark passageways on "Carelian," while "Soundhousing" is designed with a staggered flow and features Martini's sweet-toned lines and saxophonist Marco Franceschetti's blurting and swirling contrapuntal maneuvers. And the frontline generates imagery of an involved conversation as drummer Danilo Sala instigates the exchanges via his peppery support amid a flirtatious sequence of events. Another twist to the saga surfaces on the final track "The Margin," which is a euphoric jaunt, composed of supple unison choruses and a breezy, mid-tempo swing vamp. Hence, the quartet imparts a ray of sunshine for the closeout. In sum, the 71- minute production is seeded within a multidirectional outline, gushing with the quartet's fluctuating subplots and ample infusions of good cheer.

Track Listing: Trinity Default; Bhurma Dreams; Retreat; Carelian; Indian Summer; Cuernavaca; Soundhousing; Pottsum; Todos Santos; The Margin.

Personnel: Fabio Martini: clarinets; Marco Franceschetti: saxophones; Stefano Solani: double bass; Danilo Sala: drums, objects.

Title: Soundhousing | Year Released: 2014 | Record Label: Leo Records

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

CD/LP/Track Review
Read more articles
Soundhousing

Soundhousing

Leo Records
2014

buy
Confusing the Devil

Confusing the Devil

Rent Control Records
2004

buy

Related Articles

Read You'd Be So Nice To Come Home To CD/LP/Track Review
You'd Be So Nice To Come Home To
by Dan Bilawsky
Published: February 24, 2018
Read We Out Here CD/LP/Track Review
We Out Here
by Chris May
Published: February 24, 2018
Read Best of the Bootlegs 2017 CD/LP/Track Review
Best of the Bootlegs 2017
by Doug Collette
Published: February 24, 2018
Read The Asylum Years CD/LP/Track Review
The Asylum Years
by Doug Collette
Published: February 24, 2018
Read Solo Contra CD/LP/Track Review
Solo Contra
by Daniel Barbiero
Published: February 24, 2018
Read Ellipse CD/LP/Track Review
Ellipse
by Dan McClenaghan
Published: February 23, 2018
Read "Daylight Ghosts" CD/LP/Track Review Daylight Ghosts
by Nenad Georgievski
Published: July 10, 2017
Read "End Game of the Anthropocene" CD/LP/Track Review End Game of the Anthropocene
by Glenn Astarita
Published: January 8, 2018
Read "Departures" CD/LP/Track Review Departures
by Troy Dostert
Published: December 19, 2017
Read "Out Of Silence" CD/LP/Track Review Out Of Silence
by Mark Corroto
Published: November 17, 2017
Read "Infância" CD/LP/Track Review Infância
by Jack Bowers
Published: September 3, 2017
Read "A Gathering Foretold" CD/LP/Track Review A Gathering Foretold
by Geannine Reid
Published: December 12, 2017