All About Jazz

Home » Articles » CD/LP/Track Review

Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

382

SFJazz Collective: SFJAZZ Collective

John Kelman By

Sign in to view read count
Sometimes an artist receives too much exposure too early in his or her career. Case in point: saxophonist Joshua Redman, who became a leader too soon with his self-titled debut in '93. Granted he'd had some experience in the previous couple of years with father Dewey, as well as with drummer Paul Motian's Electric Bebop Band. But it seemed that things happened all too quickly; his second album, Wish, was an all-star affair with guitarist Pat Metheny, bassist Charlie Haden, and drummer Billy Higgins. Redman seemed thrust into the spotlight all too soon, and while he demonstrated promise, he wasn't totally ready for that kind of exposure.

But Warner Brothers' faith in his potential was obviously well founded. Fast forward to 2005. His new label, Nonesuch, just released two discs on the same day featuring him in seemingly diametrically-opposed contexts—Momentum, with his groove-centric Elastic Band, and the all-acoustic SF Jazz Collective, the first commercial release by the San Francisco-based musical cooperative for which Redman became artistic director not long after his relocation from New York to his native California in '02.

With an all-star cast that includes vibraphone legend Bobby Hutcherson, up-and-coming saxophonist Miguel Zenon, trumpeter Nicholas Payton, trombonist Josh Roseman, long under-acknowledged pianist Renee Rosnes, bassist Robert Hurts, and drummer Brian Blade—who's capable in any context, from Bob Dylan to Wayne Shorter—Redman has a group with the kind of broad-based possibility that makes SF Jazz Collective a remarkable blend of long-form composition and open-ended improvisation.

The Collective's premise is to perform one set from a modern jazz composer. Their '04 tour, from which these live performances were culled, paid tribute to Ornette Coleman (this year's West Coast tour will feature pieces by John Coltrane). It also inludes one set of compositions from band members, so there's a rich diversity from the get go. Zenon's opening "Lingala was inspired by a trip to Zaire, and the rich polyrhythmic tradition is a defining factor, as are the multiple striking melodies that ultimately find their way together for the tune's climax. Rosnes' "On This Day's Journey begins as a gentle waltz that features Hutcherson's always-striking improvisational construction over a soft cushion of flute and soprano sax—but it ultimately evolves from a funky modal vamp, which acts as a foundation for a powerful Zenon solo, into a briskly-swinging section that reveals Rosnes' strength as an imaginative post bop player.

The three Coleman tunes, scored by veteran arranger Gil Goldstein—"Peace, "When Will the Blues Leave and "Una Muy Bonita —retain Coleman's adventurous spirit yet introduce a stronger sense of form and, consequently, fit in perfectly with the rest of the program.

A clear justification of not only Redman's long-promised potential but also the inestimable power of musical collaboration and cooperation, SF Jazz Collective is a thoroughly modern album of post bop that should find an audience among traditionalists and forward-thinkers alike.

Visit Joshua Redman and S FJazz on the web.

Track Listing: Lingala; Peace; Of This Day's Journey; When Will the Blues Leave; Rise and Fall; Una Muy Bonita; March Madness

Personnel: Bobby Hutcherson (vibraphone, marimba); Joshua Redman (tenor and soprano saxophones, artistic director); Nicholas Payton (trumpet); Miguel Zenon (alto saxophonie, flute); Josh Roseman (trombone); Renee Rosnes (piano); Robert Hurst (bass); Brian Blade (drums)

Title: SFJazz Collective | Year Released: 2005 | Record Label: Nonesuch Records

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Related Articles

Read New Hope CD/LP/Track Review
New Hope
by Jack Bowers
Published: September 23, 2018
Read The Nobuki Takamen Trio CD/LP/Track Review
The Nobuki Takamen Trio
by Mark Sullivan
Published: September 23, 2018
Read Light Of Love CD/LP/Track Review
Light Of Love
by Dan Bilawsky
Published: September 23, 2018
Read Heaven Steps To Seven CD/LP/Track Review
Heaven Steps To Seven
by Roger Farbey
Published: September 23, 2018
Read In The Blue Light CD/LP/Track Review
In The Blue Light
by Mike Jurkovic
Published: September 23, 2018
Read Dreams And Other Stories CD/LP/Track Review
Dreams And Other Stories
by Dan McClenaghan
Published: September 22, 2018
Read "Ghost Music" CD/LP/Track Review Ghost Music
by Roger Farbey
Published: April 30, 2018
Read "Jubilation!" CD/LP/Track Review Jubilation!
by Jack Bowers
Published: June 25, 2018
Read "Es:sensual" CD/LP/Track Review Es:sensual
by Dan Bilawsky
Published: March 3, 2018
Read "Tag Book" CD/LP/Track Review Tag Book
by Jakob Baekgaard
Published: November 19, 2017
Read "Yo Soy La Tradicion" CD/LP/Track Review Yo Soy La Tradicion
by Mark Corroto
Published: September 13, 2018
Read "Essential Blues" CD/LP/Track Review Essential Blues
by Chris Mosey
Published: December 24, 2017