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Rob Brown: No More "Mr. Avant Garde"

John Sharpe By

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I don't feel the need so much to exclude elements of music that aren't traditionally jazz, and it just adds to the overall sound of the music
Rob BrownAlto saxophonist Rob Brown would feature highly on most people's lists of modern purveyors of reed magic. Leading New York avant-garde bassist William Parker has featured Brown for the last fifteen years, and Brown has been associated, both as sideman and leader, with other well-known modern jazz musicians including Matthew Shipp, Joe Morris and Whit Dickey.



A recent example is the group Right Hemisphere. He has also recorded and worked alongside such luminaries as Cecil Taylor, Anthony Braxton, Bill Dixon, Butch Morris, Reggie Workman, Henry Grimes, Roy Campbell and Karl Berger. Brown has also been building a substantial discography under his own name, on a variety of labels and with a diversity of ensembles.



Is Rob Brown still Mr. Avant-Garde?

All About Jazz: I would like to talk about some of your recent releases first. Your latest album Crown Trunk Root Funk (AUM Fidelity, 2008) was a slight departure for you, bringing in electronics and more of an earthier feel to the music. You brought Gerald Cleaver on drums and Craig Taborn on piano and electronics into the band [in addition to William Parker on bass]. What were you looking for that was different from them?

Rob Brown: Well, besides my duos and some collaborative records with Matthew Shipp, this is the only record I have as a leader with a piano. I've been playing with William (Parker) for a long time, and with the quartet, quintets and sextets coming out of that, I've been playing that music a lot. To some degree that has probably influenced my desire to have some more earthy types of elements. But it's also I think just a process of maturing and including elements of things I've liked in my life into the music. At this point in my life, I'm not really "Mr Avant-Garde." I don't really care about that any more. There was a time when I did, but that was a long time ago: I don't feel (now) that I have to have any radical stance. I want my music to be different and (to) have a unique sound and structure when (it) can, but I don't feel the need to be an experimental person.

AAJ: Is that something that has come with maturity—a mellowing?

RB: It's not a matter of mellowing. It's just that I don't feel the need to be the person out there in front, an innovative "cutting edge" person ... I don't feel that desire. Hopefully my music will stand on its own with its own sound, and some things might be innovative and some things might sound very familiar. (That) just doesn't matter to me anymore.

Rob BrownAAJ: Where did the title come from?

RB: That was complicated, because I did have a title, but we weren't in perfect agreement with the record company on it. So I went through a lot of titles and eventually Steven (Joerg) at AUM said he wanted to use imagery (for the cover) from some photos he took on a trip out to California to the redwood forests on his honeymoon. He had photos of some of the giant sequoia trees, so it basically came out of that: crown, root and trunk all being parts of a tree. So it was part of my searching for a title that fits, because titles can be real tricky things unless you have something real specific in mind. And my music isn't thematic, really.

AAJ: What you call things affects how people perceive them, so there is always that consideration.

RB: Yeah. Normally I would go for some poetic kind of thing. The title came out of a search to match the cover imagery with something that would make sense for me, and I don't think I would ever have come up with that title if I hadn't been pushed to keep trying different ones. I've had various reactions to it, but people generally don't have a problem with wondering what it's supposed to be.

AAJ: Then there's the funk bit at the end of it. You're playing tomorrow with Patricia Nicholson's Celestial Moonbeams Funk band. Is this a side of yourself that you want to show more of?

RB: Well, (it's) her band, and there's a whole range of music in there, (but) part of it is more funky, definitely. Now with my band there are elements (of funk) in there, but they are not really as overt. But the thing is that Gerald (Cleaver)—specifically—and Craig (Taborn) really can do everything, and that is the thing that makes it so great to play with them. I don't feel the need so much to exclude elements of music that aren't traditionally jazz, and it just adds to the overall sound of the music.

AAJ: Is this band going to continue as an active one?

RB: Well, I would like it to be an active one, but it is really hard to get everybody together. As it was, (for) the gig that we did at The Stone (a not—for—profit performance space dedicated to the experimental and the avant-garde in New York's East Village: The Stone) in May, William (Parker) couldn't make it and it was pretty much a miracle that it happened at all. I had a slot when everyone was supposedly going to be there, and then I got a call the next day, "Do you want to play (this particular) week?" and I said "Oh, that's great, fantastic!"



Then finally we settled on the date, and a couple of weeks before the gig I looked on the Stone website and they had given me a day two days before (the date) because they had got their signals crossed. And Gerald was coming back from England that night. So we played at 10.00pm. He had got in to the airport that evening at 7.30. I was just so happy that he could come out and play the gig after so many hours flying. So, if I can get some good enough paying gigs ... then I will certainly try to do it.

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