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7

Raymond MacDonald: Man with Two Brains

Duncan Heining By

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MacDonald continues, "I watched it and the images of the scene and the situation itself were quite discombobulating. However, when David Mackenzie said, 'Do you think you can do something with that?,' I did have the presence of mind to realise that the correct answer was 'Yes. Yes, I can do something with that.' (laughing) So, David Byrne said, 'Hire whoever you want and be in the studio next Wednesday for a six hour session.' And David McKenzie said, 'Oh, I really like "Haitian Fight Song."'"

Having decided on using the Hung Drawn Quartet, MacDonald added George Lyle on bass and Stuart Brown on drums. The way the music was recorded involved each musician having both MacDonald's arrangement of "Haitian Fight Song" and a monitor playing the custard and ketchup scene.

"So, they had the music that covered that aspect from point A to point B," MacDonald explains, "but could also step out of the music and respond to what was happening in the scene." "It was lovely working with David Byrne," he continues, "because he would just come in occasionally and say, 'Can we have a bit more of that and a bit less of that?' He was just very encouraging. I had only met him for half an hour and gone away and done the arrangement and I was worried that I might have got completely the wrong end of the stick and they might have wanted something totally different. But it just so happened that I had picked up on the right elements."

MacDonald continues to collaborate with David Mackenzie, along with 2011 Turner Prize winner Martin Boyce on a project that explores art, music and film. "So, we have been travelling quite a bit developing sculptural work, sound work and film in different contexts," he tells me and I just wonder where he finds the time.

All play and no work...

MacDonald describes pianist Satoko Fujii, with whom he has now worked on many occasions, as a "powerhouse" and as "one of the hardest working musicians around." Rather begs the question as to how one might describe Professor Raymond MacDonald, academic, teacher, saxophonist, jazz musician, free improviser, band leader, composer and auteur. I ask how he came to collaborate with Fujii and her trumpeter husband Natsuki Tamura.

"We set up a performance and a recording session in Glasgow. I picked up Satoko and Natsuki from the airport and within an hour we were in the studio making the CD Cities (Nu-Jazz 2009). To just meet someone and within a couple of hours be recording with them and to be happy with what we produced was an exciting adventure and a testament to the power of improvisation as a meeting place for collaboration and the negotiation of ideas. I've been to Japan a few times now and Satoko has been really helpful in setting up all sorts of interesting collaborations."

One hugely successful collaboration led to the album Buddy (Textile 2008), featuring the Raymond MacDonald International Big Band. MacDonald had, with Fujii's help, played with a large ensemble on a previous trip. On his next visit, he asked her if she could fix a band and book a venue and engineer, so they could record the concert. It was a stellar band with Fujii, Tamura, pianist Alister Spence, tuba player Gideon Juckes, Lloyd Swanton from the The Necks on bass and on guitar the great Jim O'Rourke. MacDonald continues the tale,

"Jim O'Rourke was interested and available. Alister Spence was in Tokyo. All the musicians invited were available. Rehearsals were about giving people a sense of the geography and the sound world of each piece and also to be sure that the signals and communication was clear. I had a set of twelve pieces and I had given myself just ten or fifteen minutes to rehearse each one. Once, I had an idea a piece was going to work, I'd move on to the next piece. So, what you hear on the CD is actually the first time the band had played the piece in detail. (laughing) I picked eight or nine pieces from the rehearsal put them into two sets and then just let whatever happened happen."

Buddy is one of my favourite free improv, large group albums. The stars were truly aligned that night. Whether written, conducted or freely improvised, its eight tracks stretch from the eerily beautiful to the darkly humorous in a way that remains focused and concise. The album is, to use again MacDonald's own words, "a testament to the power of improvisation" with a wonderful sense of completeness and integrity. MacDonald is particularly fulsome in his praise for Jim O'Rourke.

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