284

Race and Jazz Criticism

Race and Jazz Criticism
Greg Thomas By

Sign in to view read count
When I began this Race and Jazz series several months ago, I knew the topics I wanted to touch upon, and the general culture vs. race point-of-view I intended to pursue. With those chord changes (topics) and that melodic perspective (pro-culture, anti-race) in mind and at play, I figured I'd proceed with the rest by ear. As it turned out, the most recent column featured an interview with premier jazz critic and book author Gary Giddins, in which he discussed disparities in the recognition and acclaim attained by certain black American jazz critics/journalists compared to some so-called "white" jazz critics/journalists over the past generation of jazz criticism.

Yet since jazz criticism has a history that can be tracked and traced right along with the growth and development of the music, there's no need to stay confined to the past 40 or so years. "How has race played into the way jazz has been covered over the past 100+ years of the existence of the art form?" is one question that has now arisen.

Fortunately, there's a scholar who has researched jazz letters and the history of jazz criticism and has written the thus far definitive work on the critical discourse of jazz from the 1930s to the turn of this century: John Gennari. His book is Blowin' Hot and Cool: Jazz and Its Critics (University of Chicago, Press, 2006.) He's an Associate Professor of English and ALANA U.S. Ethnic Studies at the University of Vermont.

John Gennari and I first met in the late 1990s through the Jazz Study Group (JSG) at Columbia University. I was a grad student in a doctoral program in American Studies at New York University at the time. The Jazz Study Group was founded by Robert G. O'Meally, an English and Comparative Literature professor at Columbia whose scholarship has included a focus on jazz since he earned his Ph.D. at Harvard in 1975. From 1995-2006, the Jazz Study Group held quarterly meetings, mostly on the Columbia campus. Personally, I most enjoyed the occasions when the small group of about 30 of us would meet in the spacious yet cozy book- and CD/LP-lined apartment of Prof. O'Meally and his wife Jacqui Malone, a historian of American dance.

Very relevant to the conversation you are about to read is the following goal of the JSG: "to cultivate and strengthen the then-budding interdisciplinary field of jazz studies at a crucial point in its emergence as a discrete area of scholarship within the context of African American and American Studies."

Gennari's Blowin' Hot and Cold is a prime example of this interdisciplinary direction of jazz studies.

In this introductory discussion of what will be a multi-part interview, you'll discover: how and why Gennari came to focus on jazz in his academic career; the crucial importance of the rock-jazz-pop group Steely Dan to our teen experience; why jazz journalists/critics from Gary Giddins to Stanley Crouch to yours truly all tip our hats to the talents of rock critic Bob Christgau; Gennari's take on the issue of whether jazz criticism is better served by critics who have experience as a musician; the fundamental tools essential for good jazz criticism; why the scholarship of Lawrence W. Levine and Neil Leonard are so crucial to Gennari; and how jazz critics became central to the canonization of jazz as "high art."

All About Jazz: Tell us about the first time you ever wrote about music.

John Gennari: I was in high school, and I wrote a piece about a Steely Dan album, Aja (MCA, 1977), for my high school magazine, called The Cracker Barrel: The Lenox Magazine of Student Commentary. I think this was 1978. I had really been deeply into Steely Dan for a few years, and had been writing for this student magazine, and wanted to take a crack at a record review.

What I remember about the experience was just how difficult it was to talk about the music. I ended up writing a piece that mostly talked about my experience buying the record, a kind of silly story about my experience in the record store. I look back at it now as an attempt to position myself or paint myself as a record collector, a record buyer, as much as anything. Because the stuff I ended up writing about the music was just awful. By this time I had begun to think of myself as a writer, as somebody who might have some talent in that direction. I was encouraged to think that way by my English teachers and the people around this magazine.

Shop

More Articles

Read BAM or JAZZ: Part Two! Race and Jazz BAM or JAZZ: Part Two!
by Greg Thomas
Published: February 6, 2012
Read BAM or JAZZ: Why It Matters Race and Jazz BAM or JAZZ: Why It Matters
by Greg Thomas
Published: January 12, 2012
Read Race and Jazz Criticism Race and Jazz Race and Jazz Criticism
by Greg Thomas
Published: October 3, 2011
Read Gary Giddins on Ignored Black Jazz Writers Race and Jazz Gary Giddins on Ignored Black Jazz Writers
by Greg Thomas
Published: July 11, 2011
Read Race, Culture and a White Boy from Texas Race and Jazz Race, Culture and a White Boy from Texas
by Greg Thomas
Published: May 9, 2011
Read Jazz vs Racism Race and Jazz Jazz vs Racism
by Greg Thomas
Published: March 22, 2011
Read "TD Ottawa Jazz Festival 2016" Live Reviews TD Ottawa Jazz Festival 2016
by John Kelman
Published: July 3, 2016
Read "Top Ten Musicians Who Embody Cool" Top Ten List Top Ten Musicians Who Embody Cool
by Alan Bryson
Published: December 17, 2016
Read "Bill Cunliffe: A Day In the Life" Interviews Bill Cunliffe: A Day In the Life
by Tish Oney
Published: November 3, 2016
Read "SLIXS At Derry International Choral Festival 2016" Live Reviews SLIXS At Derry International Choral Festival 2016
by Ian Patterson
Published: November 2, 2016
Read "Hyde Park Jazz Festival 2016" Live Reviews Hyde Park Jazz Festival 2016
by Mark Corroto
Published: October 4, 2016

Post a comment

comments powered by Disqus

Sponsor: ECM Records | BUY NOW  

Support our sponsor

Support All About Jazz's Future

We need your help and we have a deal. Contribute $20 and we'll hide the six Google ads that appear on every page for a full year!

Buy it!