Learn How

We need your help in 2018

Support All About Jazz All About Jazz is looking for 1,000 backers to help fund our 2018 projects that directly support jazz. You can make this happen by purchasing ad space or by making a donation to our fund drive. In addition to completing every project (listed here), we'll also hide all Google ads and present exclusive content for a full year!

327

Quadro Nuevo & Tango Crash: Two Takes on Tango

Michael McCaw By

Sign in to view read count
One old and one new, Justin Time has released two records attempting to deal with tango music at its core with varying degrees of success. Neither approaches the music in the same manner as, say, Astor Piazzolla, but through either acoustic or electronic instruments, they attempt to communicate with the same soul.

Quadro Nuevo
Luna Rossa
Justin Time Records
2005

A reissue of their debut album and opening with a lilting and uplifting tune bearing the same title of the CD, Quadro Neuvo lays itself bare from the onset and rarely deviates from its core sound. Comprised of saxophonist Mulo Francel, guitarist Robert Wolf, accordionist Heinz-Ludger Jeromin, and bassist D.D. Lowka, this core sound is based on a bright playful tone that bears more sweetness than burning flame. Even a composition such as Iben Ahbez's "Nature Boy loses its dark luster of drama in favor of a more colorful and bouncy treatment.

Luna Rossa is nonetheless an enjoyable listen in a certain mindset. All four musicians are fully capable of carrying the lead, but more often than not the bass plays a traditional role of keeping a strict time while the accordion lays a swaying bed for the guitar and saxophone to float above like playful birds. Francel particularly shows himself to be an adept player with an airy tone that rises and falls with great ease.

Whether playing originals, covers, or German cinema music, Quadro Neuvo's Luna Rossa has its moments of beauty such as the episodic "Impressions d'un Rêve ; however, more often than not, there is too much sugar to recommend this album as more than a confectionery desert.

Tango Crash
Tango Crash
Justin Time Records
2005

Another tango-based album, Tango Crash is a self-titled debut that attempts to integrate electronics into this most emotional and visceral musical style. Inspired and formed following a meeting in 1987 between pianist David Almada and cellist Martin Iannaccone in Buenos Aires, in which both found themselves fond of the idea to merge traditional tango with electronic music in a more organic way, the results found here feature a sound more often than not based around the melodicism of the cello from which everything else builds.

Varied in sound and in end results almost every time, Tango Crash is an album that makes a strong case for this type of musical amalgamation. Such an example would be the engrossing "Milonga para Alberto, where Iannaccone's cello sets the melody and tone for Almada's keyboards to surround, soon raising to the top amidst a bed of sound consisting of organs and voices. As the song builds momentum through sparse electronic percussion and voice it is obvious that this is nothing like the traditional sound of tango, yet it adheres to the same sense of self and drama—especially when the darting theme re-enters, performed in unison on cello, keys, drums, and bandoneon.

Often times, the emotional content suffers from a lack of technical prowess to communicate it. Although neither of these groups have any lack of faculty, Quadro Nuevo suffers in presenting nothing but light-hearted fare. Tango Crash, on the other hand, presents a merging of two musical worlds that more often than not finds considerable success and bears further listening.


Luna Rossa

Personnel: Mulo Francel: Tenor Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone, C-Melody Saxophone, Bass Clarinet; Robert Wolf: Guitar, Octave Guitar; Heinz-Ludger Jeromin: Accordion; D.D. Lowka: Acoustic Bass, Fretless Bass, Udu Drum; William Galison: Harmonica (6,17).

Tracks: Luna Rossa; Nature Boy; Kommissar Maigret; Te Reto A Ser Mi Amante; Für Pauline; Our Spanish love Song; Impressions d'un Rêve: Tango; Impressions d'un Rêve: Valse Lento; Impressions d'un Rêve: Valse Vivace; Bonsoir Juliette; Bei Dir War Es Immer So Schön; El Paño Moruno; Il Sorriso D'Amor; Flor De La Noche; Susannata; Gracias A La Vida; Allez, Glissez!

Tango Crash

Personnel: Daniel Almada: Piano & Programming; Martin Iannaccone: Cello & Programming; Rodrigo Dominguez: Soprano Saxophone; Marcio Doctor: Percussion; Gabriel Rivano: Bandoneon; Pomo Tapia: Bandoneon; Lopecito: Voice Collage (track 8); Santiago Vazquez: Percussion (track 3).

Tracks: La Yumba; Milonga para Alberto; Red Love; El Choclo; Desde Lejos; Pararrango; Remis; Dj Peron; La Yumba (Remix).


Tags

comments powered by Disqus

More Articles

Read Ivo Perelman Makes It Rain Multiple Reviews Ivo Perelman Makes It Rain
by Mark Corroto
Published: November 12, 2017
Read Jazz from the US Virgin Islands' new breed Multiple Reviews Jazz from the US Virgin Islands' new breed
by Nigel Campbell
Published: November 4, 2017
Read Joe Rosenberg's Ensembles Multiple Reviews Joe Rosenberg's Ensembles
by Jerome Wilson
Published: November 2, 2017
Read Abbey Rader in the Spotlight: Ritual and Phenobarbital Sessions Multiple Reviews Abbey Rader in the Spotlight: Ritual and Phenobarbital...
by Kevin Press
Published: October 27, 2017
Read Two Sides of John Wetton Multiple Reviews Two Sides of John Wetton
by Geno Thackara
Published: October 20, 2017
Read "Dan Phillips Returns To Chicago" Multiple Reviews Dan Phillips Returns To Chicago
by Mark Corroto
Published: February 21, 2017
Read "2016: An Ivo Perelman Marathon" Multiple Reviews 2016: An Ivo Perelman Marathon
by Mark Corroto
Published: January 3, 2017
Read "Guitars on Three Continents" Multiple Reviews Guitars on Three Continents
by Geno Thackara
Published: July 16, 2017
Read "Two Sides of John Wetton" Multiple Reviews Two Sides of John Wetton
by Geno Thackara
Published: October 20, 2017
Read "Another Timbre’s Canadian Composers Series" Multiple Reviews Another Timbre’s Canadian Composers Series
by John Eyles
Published: April 22, 2017
Read "Lee Morgan On Music Matters" Multiple Reviews Lee Morgan On Music Matters
by Greg Simmons
Published: March 6, 2017

Support All About Jazz's Future

We need your help and we have a deal. Contribute $20 and we'll hide the six Google ads that appear on every page for a full year!

Please support out sponsor