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Triage: Premium Plastics

Mark Corroto By

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If we were to speak of jazz in terms of eras, we can agree the post-Trane era has certainly created a mixed bag of styles, theories and jazz directions. Since the passing of John Coltrane, jazz was dominated by not one force but included many. It is also now possible in 2002, to think in terms of a post-Wynton and a post-Downtown world. Saxophonist Dave Rempis, primarily known for his work in the Vandermark 5, brings forth a passionate, yet dark improvising trio (can this be considered post-Vandermark music?) with drummer Tim Daisy and bassist Jason Ajemian.

Triage's music supplies a groove with more of a nod toward European improvised music than to bebop. Tim Daisy handles the percussion duties like a quiet Han Bennink and Dave Rempis' horn invites comparisons to Eric Dolphy and Anthony Braxton. While the music here is improvisational, each piece maintains a solid compositional structure and the players sustain a stoicism to their approach. Not that Rempis doesn't let fly on the 19-minute "Spasm," but his outward blowing never risks the possibility of becoming out-of-control. Likewise Daisy never bashes, just to bash. He is given plenty of room here for drum solos, which draw from jazz and non-jazz time references. Bassist Ajemian opens "Fellini's Blues" with a bass heartbeat that becomes a melancholy solo in the moving texture of Rempis' horn and Daisy's thumb piano. "Maschine Man" starts out like a maschine (sic), with each player stamping out regular notes only to decline into bits of deconstructed textures.

Triage is quite adept at using space within their music. Generous pauses, Ajemian's bowing, and Rempis' patient saxophone work adds up to a thoroughly coherent statement. The players offer a concentrated moody textured music, a perfect soundtrack for these post-September 11 days.


Track Listing: Lawrence Of Arabia; Fleet; Pegging In; Maschine Man; Spasm; Fellini's Blues; Minu(sha); Foibles.

Personnel: Dave Rempis: alto Saxophone, tenor Saxophone; Jason Ajemian: bass; Tim Daisy: drums.

Title: Premium Plastics | Year Released: 2002 | Record Label: Solitaire Records

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