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Clark Terry: Porgy & Bess

Jerry D'Souza By

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Clark Terry: Porgy & Bess Experience and imagination are brothers-in-arms when it comes to Clark Terry and his insight into the remaking of the Gil Evans charts for Porgy and Bess. The Miles Davis recording could well have been the definitive work, but now Terry and the Chicago Jazz Orchestra breathe in some fresh air and bring in another phase to the much-hallowed music. Terry still has his chops and the ability to inject passion; age certainly has not withered those strengths. He reads with nimble ease and he has not lost his delightful sense of fun. With all those attributes intact, this venture into a classic spells success.

Terry brings his particular spirit to the compositions. "Summertime" has him use the mute, but he swings with a lively undercurrent, yet sharp-edged and soaring. The tone is broad and lush on "Bess, Oh Where's My Bess?", the flugelhorn floating and clasping the emotional crux. Terry essays it smoothly into swing before coming back again in a seamless arc. The blues are deep and beckoning—would he have it any other way? "Prayer (Oh Doctor Jesus)" testifies to his tensility and his passion. And what would a Terry recording be without a vocal? He does "Here Comes de Honey Man" with a mumble and humour. Is anything else needed? Acknowledgement would not be complete without a nod to "I Loves You, Porgy" which is beautifully delineated, his voice a beacon of luminous sentiment.

The recording also gains sinew from the Chicago Jazz Orchestra, which not only lends Terry admirable support but also envisions the music with an attitude that is compelling. As such the supporting players create an aura that is definitive, playing with verve or with delicacy, expertise of high standard. "Gone" is one of the compositions that fine tunes these aspects. The orchestration is rich and George Fludas pushes the rhythm on the drums, with Art Hoyle adding an exemplary solo before getting into an animate conversation with Terry.

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Track Listing: Buzzard Song; Bess, You is My Woman Now; Gone; Gone, Gone, Gone; Summertime; Bess, Oh Where's My Bess?; Prayer (Oh, doctor Jesus); Fishermen, Strawberry and Devil Crab; My Man's Gone Now; It Ain't Necessarily So; Here Comes de Honey Man; I Loves you, Porgy; There's a Boat That's Leaving Soon for New York

Personnel: Clark Terry--trumpet, flugelhorn, vocals; Chicago Jazz Orchestra: Artistic Director and Conductor--Jeff Lindberg

Year Released: 2004 | Record Label: A440 Music | Style: Big Band


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