Content by tag "Chris May"

ARTICLE: LIVE REVIEWS

Edward Burra, Aaron Douglas: Into The Night: Cabarets and Clubs in Modern Art

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Edward Burra, Aaron Douglas, Colette Omogbai, Uche Okeke, et al.
Barbican Art Gallery
Into The Night: Cabarets and Clubs in Modern Art
London
October 3, 2019

This evocative exhibition explores from a global perspective the role of cabarets, cafes and clubs in 1880s through late ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Cheik Tidiane Seck: Timbuktu: The Music of Randy Weston

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A well-intentioned tribute to the late pianist, composer and pioneer of Maghrebi jazz Randy Weston by the keyboard player Cheikh Tidiane Seck, Timbuktu: The Music of Randy Weston never really gets off the ground. Seck, whose c.v. includes spells with Mali's Super Rail Band de Bamako, Les Ambassadeurs, Salif Keita and Amadou & Mariam, and Senegal's ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Saxophone Summit: Street Talk

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Since coming together in 1999 to celebrate the late-period work of John Coltrane, the aptly named Saxophone Summit has lost only one original member. Michael Brecker passed in 2007 and was replaced by Ravi Coltrane, who has in turn been replaced by Greg Osby. The other principals, Joe Lovano and Dave Liebman, are unchanged, as is ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Abdullah Ibrahim: Dream Time

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Stream-of-consciousness solo-piano recitals come in as many shades as jazz itself. At one extreme are Keith Jarrett's messianic epics. At another are Abdullah Ibrahim's less flashy but deeper outings. Ibrahim's style is about substance, space and subtlety. He says more by doing less. Duke Ellington and Thelonious Monk, after all, were his formative influences.

ARTICLE: LIVE REVIEWS

Respect to Aretha at Barbican Hall

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Nona Hendryx, Bettye LaVette, José James, Alice Russell, Zara McFarlane, Antibalas
Barbican Hall
Respect to Aretha
London
September 12, 2019

Great artists deserve posthumous tributes worthy of their talent--and sometimes they get them. So far, Aretha Franklin, who passed in 2018, is doing well. The long-delayed ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Dave O'Higgins & Rob Luft: Plays Monk & Trane

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Hearing the young British guitarist Rob Luft for the first time on his debut album, Riser (Edition, 2017), was rather like hearing American guitarist Johnny Smith for the first time on Moonlight In Vermont (Roost, 1956). You knew you were listening to something special. And while much separates the players' styles, much unites them, too: Smith's ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Joe Armon-Jones: Turn To Clear View

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A cornerstone of London's underground jazz scene—as well as leading his own band he plays in Ezra Collective and groups led by the tenor saxophonists Binker Golding and Nubya Garcia—the keyboard player Joe Armon-Jones released his first own-name album, Starting Today (Brownswood), in spring 2018. A jewel of nu-fusion which owes almost as much to the ...

ARTICLE: LIVE REVIEWS

Dwight Trible at Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club

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Dwight Trible
Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club
London
August 17, 2019

Dwight Trible inhabits a song with more than just his voice, he does so with his whole body—he uses every available limb and digit and twists and turns and shoehorns himself into his material. At Ronnie's tonight he ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Nat Birchall: The Storyteller: A Musical Tribute To Yusef Lateef

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The deification of Yusef Lateef, which began only after his passing in 2013, rests on the first decade of his long recording career, from 1957—1967, when he extended the language of jazz to include elements of Asian and Middle Eastern musics while recording for Savoy, Prestige and Impulse. After a second decade with Atlantic, where he ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Binker Golding: Abstractions Of Reality Past & Incredible Feathers

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None of the new, legion improviser-composer tenor saxophonists on London's underground scene are more accomplished than Binker Golding, and unlike many avant-garde players, Golding has a thorough knowledge of the saxophonists who preceded him. His originality is, in a phrase coined by Harold Rosenberg, art critic on The New Yorker in the 1970s, “emblazoned with the ...