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ARTICLE: JAZZ POETRY

Mind

Read "Mind" reviewed by Gordon Marshall

For Yoko Miwa

She knocked me out for a year

took me to the tombs

of Egypt, where she embalmed

the brains of the first tribe

of jazz... with kindest care

she put them in their jars

labeled calligraphically

with multi-colored letters

indicating Duke and 'Trane

ARTICLE: INTERVIEWS

Lou Cohen: Opening the Door

Read "Lou Cohen: Opening the Door" reviewed by Gordon Marshall

In his cushy, classy, elegant two-story home just outside of Central Square in Cambridge, MA, Lou Cohen introduces his Symphony 5: from a laptop, jammed together fragments of elegant new music unfold, spaced out so that breath can enter in the interstices... Then the sound of roiling, rolling violins getting impacted: all is mellow and peaceful ...

ARTICLE: JAZZ POETRY

The Business of 'Trane

Read "The Business of 'Trane" reviewed by Gordon Marshall

Carlos Santana turned me on to him

in an article in Guitar Player magazine

I read at the Hingham library,

at 14: spiritual center

of his Baja brain,

and mine now,

for 35 years,

in Boston, in the rain

after a storm...

the storm--it lasted years,

Jazz and Poetry: Impacted Gems

Read "Jazz and Poetry: Impacted Gems" reviewed by Gordon Marshall

The poetry of the Beats, the New York school and the Black Mountain school, as well as the jazz poets, all share a particularly heavy rhythmic feel and an earthy, gritty imagery that creates a kind of syncopation within itself. The scenes dance and bump up against each other, cutting and rubbing up against the beat. ...

ARTICLE: BOOK EXCERPTS

Concepts of Pain: The Stuff of the Sixties

Read "Concepts of Pain: The Stuff of the Sixties" reviewed by Gordon Marshall

This chapter is an excerpt from Naked Mind: On Music and Power, a work in progress by All About Jazz contributor Gordon Marshall.


It is said that the '60s ended in 1974, with Richard Nixon's resignation. On the one hand, there was nothing left to believe in. On the other, there was ...

ARTICLE: PROFILES

The Rotten Apples: Beach Party at the Orchard

Read "The Rotten Apples: Beach Party at the Orchard" reviewed by Gordon Marshall

The Rotten Apples, “the tightest out-of-tune band in the world," had an antecedent in guitarist Keith Waters' Belmont High School band (Belmont is a town just north of Boston). Even that early evolutionary ancestor of the current band blew effortless attitude in the face of the powers that be. Waters remembers playing a party at the ...

ARTICLE: JAZZ POETRY

November (for Yoko Miwa)

Read "November (for Yoko Miwa)" reviewed by Gordon Marshall

On the ebony off-keys, your hands,

your head in a veil of black mist, tonic

to your turquoise evening gown.

Poised as a turtle dove on an eave,

you press an index finger on the ivory,

liberating a passel of scales zooming

down like falcons in a swarm,

ARTICLE: INTERVIEWS

Yoko Miwa: New Star in an Old Sky

Read "Yoko Miwa: New Star in an Old Sky" reviewed by Gordon Marshall

Self-effacing but with healthy ambition--and genuinely glamorous--pianist Yoko Miwa is a shimmering study in contrasts. Her music is loyal to sources and roots, yet it is fresh and sexy. Everything is in balance in her work. On a most elemental level she is like a graceful hostess at a grand party, catering to the desires of ...

ARTICLE: JAZZ POETRY

Black Sage (for Henry Grimes)

Read "Black Sage (for Henry Grimes)" reviewed by Gordon Marshall

I have seen the stage lights play

the sly sagacity of Henry's smile:

the lightning on his lips, decades

dark with spattered starlight

coming back to his eyes.

To win words from that smile

that opens like a jackknife

drawing blood from parchment

spurting ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEWS

Gutbucket: Cascades and Collisions

Read "Gutbucket: Cascades and Collisions" reviewed by Gordon Marshall

Over its 12-year career, Gutbucket has resituated its various musical parts like the pieces of a Rubik's cube. The elements of that cube, the sonic strains, have remained similar--an amalgam of fuzz rock, jumpy jazz, post-serial classicism--but its panoply of shifting color has been redeployed in unique ways on each of the Brooklyn-based quartet's five CDs, ...