All About Jazz

Home » Tag Center » Tag: The Complete Village Vanguard Recordings, 1961

Content by tag "The Complete Village Vanguard Recordings, 1961"

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Bill Evans Trio: The Complete Village Vanguard Recordings, 1961

Read "The Complete Village Vanguard Recordings, 1961" reviewed by Jim Santella

With one and a half hours of material, this three-disc box set proves invaluable. It brings the classic Bill Evans Trio into focus for an evening of modern jazz that's played the way it's supposed to be played. You can relish every nuance of this session because it's not loud, forceful, flashy, or intense. No, Bill ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Bill Evans: The Complete Village Vanguard Recordings, 1961

Read "The Complete Village Vanguard Recordings, 1961" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan

Certain quintessential works of art, like Van Gogh's “Starry Night or Munch's “The Scream, have been iconic and universal in their appeal to a worldwide audience. Much in the same manner, jazz has its own share of legendary recordings that have become widely appreciated, from Benny Goodman's famous appearance at Carnegie Hall in 1938 to Miles ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Bill Evans: The Complete Village Vanguard Recordings, 1961

Read "The Complete Village Vanguard Recordings, 1961" reviewed by Michael McCaw

Certain recordings have a sense of wonder, an overwhelming feeling that permeates everything going on and controls the listener's situation. Such is the case with Waltz for Debby and Sunday at The Village Vanguard, which have long been held in high regard as seminal recordings that nearly define the sound of the piano trio even today.

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Bill Evans: The Complete Village Vanguard Recordings, 1961

Read "The Complete Village Vanguard Recordings, 1961" reviewed by AAJ Staff

The consummate pianist's pianist, if you had to pick only one from the history of jazz, would have to be Bill Evans. Art Tatum and Oscar Peterson certainly have their thing, but their style is more elaborate technique than raw invention, and its very baroque nature tends to obscure its message. Evans, on the other hand, ...