Results for "Mandala"

Advanced search options

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Black Diamond: Mandala

Read "Mandala" reviewed by Samuel Stroup

It's easy to see how Chicago quartet Black Diamond fit right into the sax / sax / bass / drums tradition in jazz. In fact, with the intricate and energetic compositions, speedy and flawless solos, and evocative song titles this group's first album Mandala almost feels like a passing of the torch from the likes of ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Black Diamond: Mandala

Read "Mandala" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

This Chicago-based quartet projects a raw and vibrant soundstage, nicely balanced with breakneck speed unison lines and introspective dialogues, topped off by tenor saxophonists Artie Black and Hunter Diamond's hearty choruses. They dig deep, yet on burners like the swiftly executed bop piece “Rudy's Mood," they dish out briskly executed unison lines, leading to hyper-mode frameworks, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Oleg Kireyev: Mandala

Read "Mandala" reviewed by Mark F. Turner

Saxophonist Oleg Kireyev's Mandala is a most interesting release. At a mere three minutes and thirty-six seconds, the title track alone is an audible sonic feast with everything from thrash rock guitar, electronics, a Russian dance theme, and primal chants to Indian tabla percussion, all packed into a strong groove momentum. Kireyev's background of ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Joel Miller: Mandala

Read "Mandala" reviewed by John Kelman

Psychology icon Carl Jung believed that the Buddhist Mandala--a circle enclosing a square with a deity on each side--was representative of the “nuclear atom" of the human psyche, the unknown essence of the soul. Ever-pervasive in dreams, children's drawings and more, he felt this simple representation depicted humanity's way of forming a harmonious relationship with the ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Joel Miller: Mandala

Read "Mandala" reviewed by Michael P. Gladstone

Canadian saxophonist Joel Miller experienced an epiphany in 2002 that affected his musical direction. The title of this album dates back to Sanskrit, the ancient language of India, and has been used in a number of ways including, in this case, achieving wholeness and forming a harmonious relationship with one's self. Coincident to this important change, ...


ENGAGE!

Enter our contest giveaways

Contest Giveaways

Enter our contests with a single button click and win a chance at albums or concert tickets.

Contest Guidelines

Reader's Poll: It's your festival. Who do you book?

Fantasy Festival Poll

It's your festival, you're in charge of booking and you have an unlimited budget. Share your lineup.

More Polls

Super search project underway

Publisher's Desk

Stay current on website improvements, new features, handy tips, and more.

MORE POSTS | YEAR IN REVIEW

Shop for Music

Start your music shopping from All About Jazz and you'll support us in the process. Learn how.