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Meet John Reilly

Read "Meet John Reilly" reviewed by Tessa Souter and Andrea Wolper

John Reilly--yet another of our Super Fans who works for the city of New York--was born on Staten Island, where he still lives. We don't know if it's something to do with working for the city, or just a function of growing up in the capital of jazz, but John is the real thing. The son ...

ARTICLE: TAKE FIVE WITH...

Take Five With Michael Francis Zinna

Read "Take Five With Michael Francis Zinna" reviewed by Michael Francis Zinna

Meet Michael Francis Zinna:

60 years old. Grew up in New York and Long Island. Loved the guitar the first time I heard it. Growing up in New York, jazz was all around. My first epiphany came with the great blues renaissance of the 1960s. Then I heard Wes Montgomery and people like Barney Kesseland ...

ARTICLE: YEAR IN REVIEW

2012: The Year in Jazz

Read "2012: The Year in Jazz" reviewed by Ken Franckling

The world of jazz officially went global in 2012, kicked the Grammy Awards in the shins, dealt with economic issues and Mother Nature, and found new ways to innovate in this social media and Internet-savvy age. There were ups and there were downs for both longstanding clubs and festivals, too.

Here's a look at ...

NEWS: RECORDING

"Solar" (Davis) or "Sonny" (Wayne)?

"Solar" (Davis) or "Sonny" (Wayne)?

A long-running discussion (or argument) about the authorship of a major jazz tune may have been resolved once and for all. The tune is “Solar,” copyrighted in 1963 with name of Miles Davis as composer, nearly a decade after he recorded it. It is a 12-bar piece based, with certain departures, on the harmonic structure of ...

NEWS: MUSIC INDUSTRY

'Solar' Wasn't by Miles Davis

'Solar' Wasn't by Miles Davis

Who wrote what and when? This question pops up often when jazz fans try to figure out who composed their favorite jazz standards. And like most lamppost shadows that form in the dead of night, nothing is as it seems. For example, Richard Carpenter is credited as the composer of Walkin'. Yet little is known about ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEWS

Ray Scro: What Jazz Education Means

Read "Ray Scro: What Jazz Education Means" reviewed by Andrew J. Sammut

For Ray Scro, music education is a redundancy. He's been performing, studying and teaching music for nearly fifty years in his home of Staten Island, and throughout New York City. In the early seventies Scro studied under saxophonist and guru Lee Konitz, and he's played with Jimmy Knepper, Chuck Wayne, Charlie Persip, and Chico Hamilton, among ...

ARTICLE: RACE AND JAZZ

Jazz vs Racism

Read "Jazz vs Racism" reviewed by Greg Thomas

Jazz saved me from becoming a racist.

Back in the early to mid-1980s, while attending Hamilton College in central New York, I learned details about the transatlantic slave trade that sickened and angered me. I read about the history of the abolitionist movement in the 1800s, and the civil rights movements of last ...

NEWS: OBITUARY

George Shearing, 1919-2011

George Shearing, 1919-2011

George Shearing died early today at the age of 91. With his quintet, Shearing used a locked-hands technique at the piano, blending with vibes and piano to develop a style that resonated with listeners and became one of the most recognizable sounds in an era when jazz was still at the core of popular music. He ...

ARTICLE: FROM FAR AND WIDE

Hot and Cool: 40 Years of Jazz at NEC

Read "Hot and Cool: 40 Years of Jazz at NEC" reviewed by Marcia Hillman

New England Conservatory (NEC) is celebrating the 40th anniversary of being America's first fully-accredited Jazz Studies Program at a music conservatory. The merriment kicked off in NEC's home of Boston with a week of events in October 2009, culminating in a performance by the Wayne Shorter Quartet accompanied by the school's Philharmonia, a merger between jazz ...

NEWS: RECORDING

Chuck Wayne: String Fever

Chuck Wayne: String Fever

Had Charlie Christian not died of tuberculosis at age 25 in 1942, he certainly would have been the first guitarist to record bebop. His single-string attack on Up on Teddy's Hill with Dizzy Gillespie, captured live at Minton's in 1941, was clearly ahead of its time. But the solo was more blues than bop, a jazz ...