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George Gershwin

George Gershwin was born Jacob Gershowitz in Brooklyn in 1898, the second of four children from a close-knit immigrant family. He began his musical career as a song-plugger on Tin Pan Alley, but was soon writing his own pieces. Gershwin's first published song, "When You Want ‘Em, You Can't Get ‘Em," demonstrated innovative new techniques, but only earned him five dollars. Soon after, however, he met a young lyricist named Irving Ceaser. Together they composed a number of songs including "Swanee," which sold more than a million copies. In the same year as "Swanee," Gershwin collaborated with Arthur L

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Franz Koglmann Septet: Fruits Of Solitude

Read "Fruits Of Solitude" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Franz Koglmann must be a connoisseur of vinification, i.e. winemaking, because his Fruits Of Solitude has the feel of a master vintner at work. Specifically, wine blends like Super Tuscans or Côtes du Rhônes mark his amalgam of European chamber music and American jazz. Koglmann is a true polymath in that he hears all and rejects ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Aaron Diehl: The Vagabond

Read "The Vagabond" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

Cardinally invested, engaged and resolute on making the classical hop and the swing vice versa, pianist Aaron Diehl, double bassist Paul Sikivie and drummer Gregory Hutchinson take a deep dive into the many accords and asymmetries shared by Philip Glass and George Gershwin and come up victorious. Flush with tradition and vision, pianist Diehl's ...

ARTICLE: PROFILES

The Very Singular Mr. Ran Blake

Read "The Very Singular Mr. Ran Blake" reviewed by Duncan Heining

There have been few American composers and musicians, with the ability to encapsulate their country's music in all its racial and ethnic complexity. We might perhaps point to Aaron Copland, Leonard Bernstein, Charles Ives and perhaps, in their own distaff ways, Harry Partch and Steve Reich. In jazz, their number is fewer still--Duke Ellington and George ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Emmet Cohen: Master Legacy Series Volume 3 Featuring Benny Golson & Albert "Tootie" Heath

Read "Master Legacy Series Volume 3 Featuring Benny Golson & Albert "Tootie" Heath" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

Set aside for the moment that the combined age of the elders here is 174 years. Emmet Cohen's Masters Legacy Series Volume 3 Featuring Benny Golson & Albert “Tootie" Heath is not only a mouthful of a title, but also irascibly and irrepressibly old school. It's as if Cohen, in his youthful (29) zeal and zest ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

John Abercrombie and Don Thompson: Yesterdays

Read "Yesterdays" reviewed by Don Phipps

The late John Abercrombie's outstanding and extensive recorded legacy includes two duet albums with fellow guitarist Ralph Towner, Sargasso Sea (ECM 2008) and Five Years Later (ECM, 2014), four Gateway trio albums (with bassist Dave Holland and drummer Jack DeJohnette), and three Baseline Trio albums (with bassist Hein Van de Geyn and drummer Joe LaBarbera).

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Chet Baker: Chet

Read "Chet" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

In the early 1950s, the rural Oklahoman Chet Baker established prominent connections in the jazz world; gigs with Charlie Parker and Stan Getz led to his first recordings. The trappings of both musicians' circles were dusted with heroin and Baker's career breaks coincided with his introduction to the disease that would stifle his musical development and ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Yakir Arbib: My Name Is Yakir

Read "My Name Is Yakir" reviewed by Don Phipps

Clever and entertaining, My Name is Yakir offers a diverse potpourri of jazz standards and original compositions performed by pianist Yakir Arbib. The music contrasts standards from the Dixieland, swing, bebop and hard bop eras with five originals that mix classical idioms with loose jazz structures. Arbib certainly has talent and his technical dexterity permits him ...

ARTICLE: HISTORY OF JAZZ

Coleman Hawkins: Fifty Years Gone, A Saxophone Across Time

Read "Coleman Hawkins: Fifty Years Gone, A Saxophone Across Time" reviewed by Arthur R George

Fifty years ago this past year, Coleman Hawkins, considered the father of tenor saxophone in jazz, passed away. Thelonious Monk was pacing back and forth in the hallway outside Hawkins' hospital room when the saxophonist succumbed at age 64 on the morning of May 19, 1969, from pneumonia and other complications. Monk was holding a short ...

ARTICLE: LIVE REVIEWS

Wycliffe Gordon & Vincent Gardner At The Jazz Corner

Read "Wycliffe Gordon & Vincent Gardner At The Jazz Corner" reviewed by Martin McFie

Wycliffe Gordon & Vincent Gardner The Jazz Corner Hilton Head Island, SC November 8-9, 2019 Wycliffe “Pinecone" Gordon is an Armstrong-styled horn player and has won a Louie award to prove it. He displayed that same laid-back behind the beat timing as Louis Armstrong, which belied the clarity of phrasing ...


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