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ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Naima: Bye

Read "Bye" reviewed by Glenn Astarita

This Spanish piano trio's moniker is seemingly derived from John Coltrane's classic ballad “Naima," included on the seminal album Giant Steps (Atlantic, 1960). Nonetheless, they don't abide by conventional mainstream jazz nomenclatures. Even though the artists' engage in jazzy improvisational movements, their core methodology is not about bop or swing, and is more closely aligned with ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Meg Okura and the Pan Asian Chamber Jazz Ensemble: Naima

Read "Naima" reviewed by Raul d'Gama Rose

John Coltrane's original recording of “Naima" is extraordinarily beautiful, and it's possible that he never envisioned such a breathtaking version being played so many years after it had been composed. So hats off to the Japanese-born violinist and erhu player, Meg Okura, for conjuring up that version. As wave after wave of the song's melody unfolds ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Meg Okura: Naima

Read "Naima" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

Chamber jazz is often a misunderstood label and balance is to blame for it. Classical-leaning projects bearing this descriptor often lack passion and strong improvisational elements, but jazz artists who try to play swinging takes on pieces by J.S. Bach also miss the mark. Fortunately, violinist Meg Okura avoids these potential pitfalls and manages to find ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Meg Okura: Naima

Read "Naima" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Naima is the name of one of saxophonist John Coltrane's more famous compositions. It's also the name of Japanese violinist Meg Okura's CD release. Joined by her nine-piece Pan Asian Jazz Ensemble, Okura has honed a finely-crafted set of chamber jazz, with all players being equals, and all players getting their chances to play the melody, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Olivier Nussbaum: Naima

Read "Naima" reviewed by AAJ Italy Staff

Il titolo dell'album, riccamente evocativo per i jazzofili, non tragga in inganno. Qui, di coltraniano, c'è ben poco. Semplicemente, con questo titolo il contrabbassista svizzero Olivier Nussbaum ha voluto sottolineare quanto il suo percorso musicale sia stato influenzato da Naima, dalla sua semplicità compositiva ma soprattutto dalla sua intensità. Naturalmente, talvolta la linea melodica del celebre brano di Coltrane ...