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ARTICLE: RADIO

Jazz on Central Avenue - Bebop in Los Angeles (1945 - 1948)

Read "Jazz on Central Avenue - Bebop in Los Angeles (1945 - 1948)" reviewed by Russell Perry

Most of the pioneering bebop musicians we have featured in the past several programs were based in New York—Bird, Dizzy, Monk, Bud Powell, Coleman Hawkins, Fats Navarro, J.J. Johnson, Max Roach. While New York may have dominated the modern music scene, it wasn't the only scene. The wartime economy in southern California brought an influx of ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Big Ten Inch Record

Read "Big Ten Inch Record" reviewed by Patrick Burnette

As the great Sigmund Freud said, sometimes an EP is just an EP. In this case, actually, it's six EP's, as the boys look at that chimera of the early LP era, the ten-inch long-playing record, focusing on releases from the early to mid-nineteen fifties on Blue Note and Fantasy, along with a Resonance Records' Record ...

ARTICLE: YEAR IN REVIEW

2018: The Year in Jazz

Read "2018: The Year in Jazz" reviewed by Ken Franckling

The year 2018 was a busy one for the jazz world. The genre's version of the #MeToo movement resulted in a new Code of Conduct and other efforts to make the music workplace more equitable. International Jazz Day brought its biggest stage to St. Petersburg, Russia. The Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz, which ran a high-profile ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Charlie Parker: Now's The Time

Read "Now's The Time" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

In the pantheon of jazz saxophonists, Charlie Parker has been among the most transformational of artists, despite not living nearly long enough to fulfill his potential. Parker's lifetime, as a principal architect of bebop, and a self-destructive force, has been documented ad nauseam but his music continues to significantly influence new generations. Since Parker's death in ...

ARTICLE: UNDER THE RADAR

Blue Highways and Sweet Music: The Territory Bands, Part II

Read "Blue Highways and Sweet Music: The Territory Bands, Part II" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Part 1 | Part 2

Part 1 of Blue Highways and Sweet Music: The Territory Bands looked at the roots, drivers and challenges of the travelling groups who brought jazz music to the non-urban areas of the Southern Plains, through one-night-stands, in often impromptu venues. A black phenomenon, often misappropriated by white musicians, promoters, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Benjamin Boone: The Poetry of Jazz

Read "The Poetry of Jazz" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Benjamin Boone's The Poetry Of Jazz could easily have been titled The Jazz of Poetry because of the almost interchangeable nature of the terms. The composer/saxophonist's vision to put music to the U.S. Poet Laureate Philip Levine's prose is a reminder to listeners that jazz was birthed by the common man, and is not to be ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Benjamin Boone: The Poetry of Jazz

Read "The Poetry of Jazz" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Benjamin Boone's The Poetry Of Jazz could easily have been titled The Jazz of Poetry because of the almost interchangeable nature of the terms. The composer/saxophonist's vision to put music to the U.S. Poet Laureate Philip Levine's prose is a reminder to listeners that jazz was birthed by the common man, and is not to be ...

ARTICLE: UNDER THE RADAR

Flame Keepers: National Jazz Museum in Harlem

Read "Flame Keepers: National Jazz Museum in Harlem" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

On 129th Street, in the heart of Harlem, Loren Schoenberg emerges from a crowded back room with an unusual looking recording. Aluminum discs like the one he holds, were the first instant, electrical means of recording. Invented in 1929 they were a means of allowing radio stations to record and archive live programs that could be ...

ARTICLE: HI-RES JAZZ

Charles Mingus and Miles Davis: Changing Moods

Read "Charles Mingus and Miles Davis: Changing Moods" reviewed by Mark Werlin

The recordings of Charles Mingus in the mid-1950s document a musical voice so distinctive that they are immediately recognizable today. But Mingus' obsessive commitment to the primacy of the composition was not always shared by his peers, nor understood by his critics.

A public feud between Mingus, who was struggling unsuccessfully to win critical ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEWS

Erik Friedlander: A Little Cello?

Read "Erik Friedlander: A Little Cello?" reviewed by Ian Patterson

Normally lumped into the 'miscellaneous instruments' category of jazz awards, the cello has been something of a bit player in the colorful history of jazz. That said, today there are arguably more cellists in jazz and contemporary improvised music--and some extraordinary ones at that--than ever before. One of the best known cellists is undoubtedly Erik Friedlander, ...