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Content by tag "Tollef Østvang"

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Friends & Neighbors: What's Next

Read "What's Next" reviewed by John Sharpe

With its fourth release, the Scandinavian quintet Friends & Neighbors, whose moniker references Ornette Coleman's album of near enough the same name, continues to find fertile soil in the American free jazz furrow. This time out the unchanged quintet of trumpeter Thomas Johansson, reedman André Roligheten, pianist Oscar Grönberg, bassist Jon Rune Strøm and percussionist Tollef ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The Way Ahead: Bells, Ghosts and other Saints

Read "Bells, Ghosts and other Saints" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Perry Farrell, of the rock band Jane's Addiction, might have said/sung it best in 1988, on the track “Ted, Just Admit it..." when he whispered “Nothing's Shocking." Indeed, nothing is in the 21st century. Marcel Duchamp's painting “Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2" (1912) is mostly admired today, and certainly not the trigger for a riot. ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Mars Williams / Tollef Østvang: Painted Pillars

Read "Painted Pillars" reviewed by Mark Corroto

If you only know saxophonist Mars Williams from his gigs with the post-punk band The Psychedelic Furs or the hip-hop/funk band Liquid Soul, you're missing out on a talented and dedicated free-jazz improviser. He scatters himself in many directions, from collaborations with Chicago's Ken Vandermark, Tim Daisy, Jim Baker and Michael Zerang, to work in Europe ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Friends & Neighbors: What's Wrong

Read "What's Wrong" reviewed by John Sharpe

Norwegian quintet Friends & Neighbors' third CD presents a line up unchanged sinceNo Beat Policy(Øra Grammofon, 2011) and Hymn For A Hungry Nation (Clean Feed, 2014). The moniker gives a clue as to their inspiration, referencing one of Ornette Coleman's less well known albums recorded live at his Prince Street loft and featuring a chorus of ...

ARTICLE: YEAR IN REVIEW

John Sharpe's Best Releases of 2015

Read "John Sharpe's Best Releases of 2015" reviewed by John Sharpe

Here in no special order are ten new releases, reviewed in All About Jazz, which stood out among those I heard this year.

Mats Gustafsson
Hidros 6 Knockin'
(Not Two Records)

An avant-garde jazz composition based on the songs of '50s rocker Little Richard. Really? Yep, that's the premise ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Martin Küchen/Jon Rune Strøm/Tollef Østvang: Melted Snow

Read "Melted Snow" reviewed by John Sharpe

Not Quite All Included or Some Included might be appropriate names for the trio of Swedish saxophonist Martin Küchen, and Norwegian bassist Jon Rune Strøm and drummer Tollef Østvang. Reason being that the repertoire on Melted Snow partially replicates that on Satan in Plain Clothes (Clean Feed, 2015) by All Included, which comprises the same threesome ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Keefe Jackson/Josh Berman/Jon Rune Strøm/Tollef Østvang: Southern Sun

Read "Southern Sun" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Americans have discovered Norwegian jazz artists through several sources. Manfred Eicher's ECM label has produced music by the now famous artists: Arild Andersen, Jan Garbarek, Tord Gustavsen, Terje Rypdal, Trygve Seim and Nils Petter Molvaer. Their success bled into the modern sounds of Bugge Wesseltoft, Per Zanussi, Håvard Wiik, and Hakon Kornstad. Perhaps the closest connection ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

All Included: Satan In Plain Clothes

Read "Satan In Plain Clothes" reviewed by John Sharpe

Cooperative five piece All Included goes from strength to strength on Satan In Plain Clothes, building on the already considerable charms of their debut Reincarnation Of A Free Bird (Stone Floor, 2012). Connections abound in the unchanged line up which reflects the burgeoning, almost incestuous, Scandinavian scene. Check out the overlaps in personnel among groups such ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Universal Indians with Joe McPhee: Skullduggery

Read "Skullduggery" reviewed by Enrico Bettinello

Un po' di collegamenti e incroci.
Il trio Universal Indians trae il proprio nome dal pezzo di Albert Ayler che chiudeva il disco Love Cry.
Ispirarsi a Ayler -o comunque a quel momento storico e espressivo in cui il sassofonista si trovò a agire, insieme a John Coltrane, Ornette Coleman e soci... ...