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Content by tag "Coleman Hawkins"

ARTICLE: INTERVIEWS

George Wein: A Life and Legend in Jazz

Read "George Wein: A Life and Legend in Jazz" reviewed by Doug Hall

Last summer, in June of 2017, I had the privilege and opportunity to interview George Wein, founder and producer of the seminal Newport Jazz Festival. At 91, he was just in the process of supporting and transitioning the new artistic director Christian McBride into this demanding and critical role for the future of the Newport Jazz ...

Claudia Döffinger: Monochrome

Read "Monochrome" reviewed by Gareth Thompson

The turkey trot and tango became so popular by 1914 that the Vatican saw fit to denounce them. American ballrooms, once invaded by European dance steps, were now throbbing to these sexier moves. In his eminent book, The History Of Jazz, author Ted Gioia argues that such new currents in social dancing also forced a change ...

ARTICLE: UNDER THE RADAR

Blue Highways and Sweet Music: The Territory Bands, Part I

Read "Blue Highways and Sweet Music: The Territory Bands, Part I" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

OriginsBy the second half of the 1920s, New York had supplanted jny: Chicago as the center of jazz. The “Jazz Age"--a label incorrectly ascribed to F. Scott Fitzgerald--could rationally have been framed as the “Dance Age." Prohibition, and the speakeasies that it spawned, were packed with wildly enthusiastic patrons of the jny: Charleston, Black Bottom, Shimmy, ...

Ab Baars: And She Speaks - A Collection Of Ballads

Read "And She Speaks - A Collection Of Ballads" reviewed by Mark Corroto

Mike Doughty of the rock band Soul Coughing wrote the lyric “is Chicago, Is Not Chicago..." to the song of the same name, followed by “a man cuts in half, just like he snaps a pencil..." The same could be said of And She Speaks -A Collection Of Ballads by saxophonist / clarinetist Ab Baars. This ...

Salvo Losappio: Long Story Short

Read "Long Story Short" reviewed by Jack Bowers

Although Long Story Short is an entirely appropriate title for Italian-born tenor saxophonist Salvo Losappio's debut CD as leader, as its playing time is a lean LP-like thirty-eight minutes, Rush Job might have been an even better one. Losappio's name and face adorn the front cover of the album, which names his four sidemen but does ...

ARTICLE: UNDER THE RADAR

State and Mainstream: The Jazz Ambassadors and the U.S. State Department

Read "State and Mainstream: The Jazz Ambassadors and the U.S. State Department" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

The Cold War that began in 1947 and ran for forty-four years, had jazz music as its primary deterrent to global tensions, and it did more to foster good will between the U.S. and global citizens than any previous program launched by the U.S. Department of State. Jazz music, even in its Golden Age, was seldom ...

Meet Mark Weber

Read "Meet Mark Weber" reviewed by Tessa Souter and Andrea Wolper

Almost every aspect of Mark Weber's life ends up intersecting with jazz; he just might be the original Renaissance jazz fan. A former wedding photographer, he found himself photographing nearly every jazz musician to pass through Los Angeles and Albuquerque in the past several decades and, without planning to, ended up writing for CODA, deejaying a ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEWS

Julian Pressley: From The Duke To Ornette In His Own Way

Read "Julian Pressley: From The Duke To Ornette In His Own Way" reviewed by Victor L. Schermer

Julian Pressley isn't exactly a household name, but it's a name every jazz aficionado should know. When he plays his alto saxophone, ears perk up because he's playing what they came to hear: music that embodies the legacy. Passionate, quick-witted, and full of new ideas, Pressley stands out in the crowd, a genuine original. Yet you ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Daniel Meron: This Was Now

Read "This Was Now" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Brooklyn-based pianist Daniel Meron rebels against the sometimes irksome ubiquity of electronic connectedness--smartphones, the internet, social media--with This Was Now, a solo piano recording of jazz standards, popular songs, Great American Songbook tunes, one free improvisation and one Israeli traditional song. He opens with the venerable “Body and Soul," a tune written in 1930, and launched ...

ARTICLE: DVD/FILM REVIEWS

Django: A Film As Much About History and Culture as About A Musical Icon

Read "Django: A Film As Much About History and Culture as About A Musical Icon" reviewed by Victor L. Schermer

Django
Director: Étienne Comar
Milky Way
2017

Django Reinhardt (1910-1953) practically invented jazz guitar. A product of gypsy culture and music, living and working in Paris in the 1930s-40s, he and his group, the Hot Club Quintet, which notably included violinist Stephane Grappelli, brought their own brand of swing to the ...