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Content by tag "George Burt"

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Glasgow Improvisers Orchestra: GIO Sevens

Read "GIO Sevens" reviewed by Duncan Heining

Back in the 60s, there was a pop show on British TV called Thank Your Lucky Stars. It featured a “spin-a-disc" segment, where a DJ and three teenagers scored a clutch of 45s on a scale of one to five. One of these was a girl from the West Midlands called Janice Nicholls, who delighted audiences ...

ARTICLE: PROFILES

Barry Guy: Back to the Drawing-Board (Part 3)

Read "Barry Guy: Back to the Drawing-Board (Part 3)" reviewed by Duncan Heining

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

One of the things which may strike the listener on hearing the London Jazz Composers' Orchestra for the first time is just how much volume Guy is able to draw from just seventeen to twenty players. Some other big bands sound almost insipid in comparison. There ...

ARTICLE: PROFILES

Raymond MacDonald: Man with Two Brains

Read "Raymond MacDonald: Man with Two Brains" reviewed by Duncan Heining

By way of introduction...

Saxophonist Raymond MacDonald is a busy man. He balances the life of a gigging, recording musician with a high-flying academic career and, in both respects, his reputation has grown far beyond his Glasgow home. As a musician, he is perhaps best known for his work with the George Burt/Raymond MacDonald ...

ARTICLE: PROFILES

A Madman’s Approach To Music And Why Can't Music Be Like A Tree?

Read "A Madman’s Approach To Music And Why Can't Music Be Like A Tree?" reviewed by Duncan Heining

"Art alone makes life possible." --Joseph Beuys.

The Glasgow Improvisers' Orchestra is unique. It's an over-used word, I know, but in this case fully justified. GIO are unique in so many ways--in the way they formed, the way they make decisions, in their make-up, how they work and most importantly how they sound. They ...

ARTICLE: EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Glasgow Improvisers Orchestra: Artificial Life

Read "Glasgow Improvisers Orchestra: Artificial Life" reviewed by Duncan Heining

The importance of ensembles such as the Glasgow Improvisers Orchestra cannot be underestimated. Their work since their formation defines a distinctive approach to large-scale, free improvisation rooted in a well-defined philosophy of collective music-making. As George Lewis, trombonist and 'composer' of Artificial Life, remarks in the record's sleevenotes:

“As with all improvisation, including our ...


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