All About Jazz

Home » Tag Center » Tag: MoFrancesco Quintetto

Content by tag "MoFrancesco Quintetto"

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

MoFrancesco Quintetto: Kucheza

Read "Kucheza" reviewed by Chris Mosey

This album features a new, jazz version of the oldest song in the world. “The Seikilos Epitaph," probably from 200BC, was found engraved on a tombstone, or stele near the ancient Greek city of Ephesus in what is now Turkey.

It was signed by someone called Seikilos and dedicated to Euterpe, most likely ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

MoFrancesco Quintetto: Kucheza

Read "Kucheza" reviewed by Sacha O'Grady

Jazz has certainly come a long way since its early beginnings, whose free spirit and richness of form means that one could easily spend a whole lifetime marvelling at its infinite variety. And none more so than on Kucheza, the MoFrancesco Quintetto's sublime and engaging new album. Based in Lisbon, Portugal, European jazz doesn't get any ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

MoFrancesco Quintetto: Piedra Solar (MoFrancesco Quintetto)

Read "Piedra Solar (MoFrancesco Quintetto)" reviewed by Budd Kopman

The MoFrancesco Quintetto, led by super-bassist Francesco Valente is one powerhouse group that will blow your socks off playing originals anchored in hard-bop with an Iberian twist, but who also can show a softer, more melodic side.

Piedra Solar features the core group (Valente, drummer/percussionist Miguel Moreira, pianist Iuri Gaspar, Johannes Krieger on trumpet ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

MoFrancesco Quintetto: Piedra Solar

Read "Piedra Solar" reviewed by Mehdi El Mouden

Piedra Solar--the second album of the MoFrancesco Quintetto--is deeply rooted in Mediterranean and latin influences.

Highly structured yet with a pint of improvisation, the songs reveal deep consideration of past influences, familiar themes, and novel straight ahead jazz. In the Quintet's words, the album pays homage to the Iberian Peninsula where Italian bass lead ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

MoFrancesco Quintetto: Piedra Solar

Read "Piedra Solar" reviewed by Chris Mosey

Time was when jazz flirtations with the Iberian Peninsula were limited to the gentle rattle of castanets followed by Rodrigo's “Concierto De Aranjuez" and a feeling you were doing something intellectual. No more.

Francesco Valente cites as a major source of inspiration for this album--a homage to his adopted homeland--Portuguese author Jose Saramago's ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

MoFrancesco Quintetto: Piedra Solar

Read "Piedra Solar" reviewed by Roger Farbey

The instantly engaging “Ala'Ad-Din" opens this 70 minute set, the second album by this talented Lisbon-based group. A bass and piano riff confidently introduces “Abraxas" with unison horns taking up the main theme, leader Francesco Valente's electric bass to the fore and Brazilian guest percussionist Marcos Suzano playing pandeiro to great effect.

Aline Frazão's ...

MoFrancesco Quintetto: Maloca

Read "Maloca" reviewed by Ian Patterson

Italian bassist Francesco Valente's fascination with the culture of Brazil inspired the title of this album. A moloca is an Amazonian ancestral longhouse and a habitat for sharing knowledge, stories and music. In this case, the communal home is his adopted Lisbon and Valente's family is a multi-national quintet whose musical ancestors have bequeathed the jazz ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

MoFrancesco Quintetto: Maloca

Read "Maloca" reviewed by Edward Blanco

Having appeared as a sideman on countless albums for over a decade, Italian bassist Francesco Valente finally unveils his first effort as leader with the modern jazz and fusion-like Maloca fronting his MoFrancesco Quintetto as they perform a session of fresh new originals exemplifying some of the styles and sounds of the Mediterranean area. Valente honed ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

MoFrancesco Quintetto: Maloca

Read "Maloca" reviewed by Chris Mosey

A maloca is an ancestral long house used by Indians in the Amazonian jungle to receive outsiders and exchange knowledge and ideas.

Italian bassist Francesco Valente became fascinated with the idea of the maloca on a trip to Brazil, Bolivia and Peru. A close perusal of the album cover reveals him doing a ...