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Content by tag "Braithwaite & Katz Communications"

Pete Malinverni: Heaven

Read "Heaven" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

New York City-based pianist Pete Malinverni is a spiritual man. It's a side of his musical personality that he explores with depth and clarity on Heaven, a mostly trio affair that puts his succinct feel for the sacred, his supple and exquisite touch and his improvisational elan in the forefront on a gorgeous set of music. ...

Dominique Eade & Ran Blake: Town And Country

Read "Town And Country" reviewed by Jerome Wilson

Pianist Ran Blake has a long track record of collaborations with vocalists starting over 50 years ago when he made the album The Newest Sound Around with Jeanne Lee and continuing in the years since in recordings with Chris Connor, Christine Correa and Sara Serpa among others. This is his second meeting on disc with his ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Ed Palermo: The Adventures of Zodd Zundgren

Read "The Adventures of Zodd Zundgren" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

It isn't a characteristically positive sign when an album incorporates obvious humor into its credits and occasionally, the music itself. The Adventures of Zodd Zundgren could raise red flags with its title, personnel adjectives such as “Terrifying Trombones" and listing Kellyanne Conway as “Alternative Executive Producer." But a listener familiar with The Ed Palermo Big Band, ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Mostly Other People Do The Killing: Paint

Read "Paint" reviewed by Jerome Wilson

Mostly Other People Do The Killing have released their second CD of 2017 and, in keeping with the group's unpredictability, it's a bit of a curve ball. Whereas on previous releases they've ranged in size from a quartet to a septet, this time they've cut themselves down to a simple piano trio. Other than that, it's ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Satoko Fujii Quartet: Live At Jazz Room Cortez

Read "Live At Jazz Room Cortez" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

As prolific as Satoko Fujii is, she has never sacrificed quality for quantity. With a half-dozen leader/co-leader releases in just the past year, no two albums have conveyed redundancy, and none have fallen short of her serious artistic standards. Following the live sessions that led to Satoko Fujii's solo recording Invisible Hand (Cortez Sound, 2017), the ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Rudresh Mahanthappa: Agrima

Read "Agrima" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Ancestral influences have long occupied second-generation Indian-American saxophonist/composer Rudresh Mahanthappa's thinking and have strongly influenced his music. That was especially true in the case of his 2008 Indo-Pak Coalition album Apti (Innova Recordings) and now with Agrima. But there is an obvious evolutionary leap in the near decade between releases; a measure of the progression is ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Brian Carpenter’s Ghost Train Orchestra: Book Of Rhapsodies Vol. II

Read "Book Of Rhapsodies Vol. II" reviewed by Jerome Wilson

There have been several ensembles in the past couple of decades that delved into the novelty jazz recordings of the Thirties and Forties. In the Netherlands there have been The Beau Hunks and the Willem Breuker Kollektief and in this country there have been Don Byron's Bug Music group and Brian Carpenter's Ghost Train Orchestra.

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Barry Altschul featuring Jon Irabagon & Joe Fonda: The 3Dom Factor: Live in Krakow

Read "The 3Dom Factor: Live in Krakow" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Recorded live at the Alchemia Club in Krakow, Poland, Barry Altschul's 3dom Factor offers the third group release in an informal trilogy that began with their self-titled album (TUM, 2012). That debut--Altschul's first leader outing in a couple dozen years--consisted of nine Altschul originals, and one from Carla Bley. A blend of post-bop and free playing, ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Lauren Kinhan: A Sleepin' Bee

Read "A Sleepin' Bee" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

Leaning on touchstones as a creative resource can be tricky business. If an artist puts too much stock in the original, they end up with a second-rate likeness of the archetype. But if they move too far away from the model, the tether breaks and the connection is completely lost in the wind. It takes a ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Wadada Leo Smith: Solo: Reflections and Meditations on Monk

Read "Solo: Reflections and Meditations on Monk" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Wadada Leo Smith comes to the music of Thelonious Monk from a childhood admiration of the artist. As a pre-teen he was already playing trumpet and composing and instinctively knew that Monk's understanding of music and sound would influence his own creativity. Smith believes that the quintessence of Monk can best be found in his solo ...


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