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Bill Frisell: Music IS

Read "Music IS" reviewed by John Kelman

The tradition of solo jazz guitar recordings is a long one, with guitarists like Johnny Smith, Al Viola, George Van Eps, Lenny Breau and Joe Pass demonstrating just how far a mere six (in some cases, seven) strings could be taken on their own as far back as the 1950s. Subsequent guitar soloists like John Abercrombie ...

NEWS: VIDEO / DVD

Videos: Three Guitar Masters

Videos: Three Guitar Masters

Since it's Friday, I thought I'd end the week by sharing with you three separate videos of true jazz guitar masters—Louis Stewart, Joe Pass and Lenny Breau. I think you'll agree that all three are at their finest here. In each case, I found videos you wouldn't be able to stop watching even if you had ...

ARTICLE: TOP TEN LIST

Top Ten Guitarists Who Left Us Too Soon

Read "Top Ten Guitarists Who Left Us Too Soon" reviewed by Alan Bryson

Ranking musicians is a hopelessly flawed endeavor. It's about as meaningful as having a list of the top ten best tasting foods. Taste is highly individualized, influenced by mood, familiarity, and the way in which multiple variables interact. One person's escargot is someone else's slice of Chicago style pizza. I just took a break and searched ...

Steve Herberman, Hristo Vitchev, Rick Stone and Harvey Valdes

Read "Steve Herberman,  Hristo Vitchev, Rick Stone and Harvey Valdes" reviewed by Dom Minasi

Welcome back to Guitarists Rendezvous, our third installment in a series that introduces readers to emerging or established guitarists who fly just under the radar of public recognition. Each will field the same four questions and we've included audio and video so you can sample their music.

This installment includes a diverse group ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Nobuki Takamen: Solo Guitar

Read "Solo Guitar" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

Jazz guitarist Nobuki Takamen plays like someone with nothing to prove as he takes on that most difficult challenge: a truly solo jazz recording, with no overdubbing or electronics. His playing throughout is confident and mature, with no extraneous display. Which is not to say that his technique is lacking: the opener “Someday" effortlessly goes from ...

ARTICLE: TAKE FIVE WITH...

Take Five With Mason Razavi

Read "Take Five With Mason Razavi" reviewed by Mason Razavi

Meet Mason Razavi:
Starting out as a self-taught rock guitarist, Mason began studying jazz and playing in working rock bands as a teenager. After hearing an Andres Segovia recording for the first time at age 22, Mason changed directions dramatically and focused on the classical guitar for several years before returning to jazz and the ...

Ryan Blotnick: Solo, Volume I

Read "Solo, Volume I" reviewed by Mario Calvitti

Dopo due album a suo nome registrati con formazioni variabili (trio, quartetto, quintetto), il giovane chitarrista Ryan Blotnick (classe 1983) ha sentito il bisogno di ritrovare una dimensione più intimista, dedicandosi intensamente alla pratica del solo, allo stesso tempo ritornando nel nativo Maine dopo alcuni anni trascorsi a New York. Ne scaturisce un lavoro delicato e ...

Jonathan Kreisberg: ONE

Read "ONE" reviewed by John Kelman

The liner notes may say no overdubs or loops were used, but Jonathan Kreisberg might just as easily have included that “No guitars were harmed in the making of ONE." Beyond work with artists like vibraphonist Joe Locke on Sticks and Strings (Music Eyes, 2007) and organist Dr. Lonnie Smith on Spiral (Palmetto, 2010), the guitarist ...

NEWS: TV / FILM

The Tragic Life of Lenny Breau

The Tragic Life of Lenny Breau

Jazz guitarist Lenny Breau was born in Maine in 1941 to parents who were country music performers. According to Wikipedia, he began playing guitar at age 8 and soon became a member of his parents' band after they moved to Canada. In 1959, his father slapped him in the face for playing jazz improvisation on stage, ...

ARTICLE: TALKIN' BLUES

Talkin' Blues with Barbara Dennerlein

Read "Talkin' Blues with Barbara Dennerlein" reviewed by Alan Bryson

If there were a Guinness World Records prize for jazz artist with the biggest organ, it could very well go to Barbara Dennerlein. No doubt, her Hammond B3 was a disc-crushing bane for countless roadies over the past three decades, but a B3 pales in comparison to what she's been playing lately. Imagine five organs with ...