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Content by tag "Two for the Show Media"

Isamu McGregor: Resonance

Read "Resonance" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

It has been five years since the release of pianist Isamu McGregor's debut Live at the Baked Potato! (Amorphous Paraphernalia Records, 2012) and his Resonance turns out to be well worth the wait. While the first album was solidly entrenched in the fusion arena, the current outing is a genre defying and eclectic collection with an ...

Sergio Pamies: What Brought You Here?

Read "What Brought You Here?" reviewed by Troy Dostert

On his third release as a leader, pianist Sergio Pamies continues his project of uniting the musical languages of jazz and the flamenco tradition of his native Spain. While his previous release from 2011, Borrachito, had a somewhat stronger emphasis on the latter, on his current record it's mainstream jazz that is the central focus, albeit ...

Guy Mintus Trio: A Home In Between

Read "A Home In Between" reviewed by Troy Dostert

Although he's only 25, pianist Guy Mintus has already forged a musical vision well beyond his years. And he's got sensational chops to match it, as A Home In Between makes clear. It's an outstanding piano trio disc, with a compelling hybrid of styles that includes bop, classical and Israeli and Eastern European folk influences. There ...

Ted Chubb: Gratified Never Satisfied

Read "Gratified Never Satisfied" reviewed by Troy Dostert

Trumpeter Ted Chubb offers a well-balanced album of four originals and four thoughtfully-arranged covers on Gratified Never Satisfied, his third record as a leader. With solid, in-the-pocket musicianship and strong chemistry among his bandmates, it's an enjoyable outing likely to generate some buzz for this up-and-coming jazzman.

Chubb is a disciplined, meticulous soloist, and ...

Isamu McGregor: Resonance

Read "Resonance" reviewed by Troy Dostert

On this album, his second as a leader since 2012's Live at the Baked Potato, pianist/keyboardist Isamu McGregor continues to hone his approach to crafting intelligent, challenging jazz fusion. With bassist Evan Marien and drummer Gene Coye once again at his side, he's got the right partners for navigating his maze-like compositions, and guest spots by ...

Tal Cohen: Gentle Giants

Read "Gentle Giants" reviewed by Troy Dostert

Surrounded by top-shelf support, pianist Tal Cohen makes a significant statement on Gentle Giants, his second album as a leader. Not content merely to demonstrate his formidable technique, he brings a unique compositional vision to his craft, pulling from his early exposure to Jewish folk music and an extensive immersion in classical composers like Chopin and ...

John Yao Quintet: Presence

Read "Presence" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

As human beings we tend to take the very notion of presence for granted, be it the presence of a loved one in our lives, the presence manufactured by our own actions as we present ourselves to the world, or the presence of all that comes and goes in our daily existence. For some reason these ...

Tamuz Nissim & George Nazos: Liquid Melodies

Read "Liquid Melodies" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

This meaningful title perfectly encapsulates the combined sonics of Israeli vocalist Tamuz Nissim and Greek guitarist George Nazos. When these two pair up they manage to develop a hydrous happening full of mellifluous designs, clear flowing thoughts, and dulcet tones. They're fluid in action, fluent in various dialects of the jazz language, and full of interesting ...

Fabian Almazan: Alcanza

Read "Alcanza" reviewed by Troy Dostert

When his debut record, Personalities, was released in 2011, pianist Fabian Almazan put everyone on notice: this was a musician unafraid to take some big chances with his craft. That album began with a piece by Shostakovich (augmented with a string quartet and electronics, no less), and it effectively established the trajectory Almazan has continued ever ...

Berta Moreno: Little Steps

Read "Little Steps" reviewed by Troy Dostert

When first seeing the title of Berta Moreno's debut record, one might be tempted to interpret it as a self-effacing gesture. Perhaps the tenor saxophonist is acknowledging her debt to the giant steps of the master of the tenor, John Coltrane himself? Upon further investigation, however, Moreno makes clear in her notes to the album that ...


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