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ARTICLE: LIVE REVIEWS

Joe Doubleday Quartet At The Jazz Corner

Read "Joe Doubleday Quartet At The Jazz Corner" reviewed by Martin McFie

Joe Doubleday Quartet
The Jazz Corner
Hilton Head Island, SC
October 24-25, 2019

The Joe Doubleday quartet centered around the mellow sounds of the house Musser vibraphone. Its precisely tuned bars of varying lengths are each suspended over equally tuned resonator tubes. A spinning rod runs across the ...

ARTICLE: UNDER THE RADAR

The New Golden Age of Jazz Radio

Read "The New Golden Age of Jazz Radio" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

There was the Jazz Age, and later, the Golden Age of Radio. There was no golden age of jazz radio unless one considers the brief, ten-year reign of devolution when swing music dominated the airwaves. Think about this: New York City has not had a twenty-four-hour commercial jazz radio station in over ten years; decades longer ...

ARTICLE: FROM FAR AND WIDE

Istanbul Jazz: So Close to the Music, So Far From New York

Read "Istanbul Jazz: So Close to the Music, So Far From New York" reviewed by Arthur R George

That any musician, old cat, young lion, or apprentice anywhere, endeavors in jazz is amazing enough, given the elusiveness of “success." That is even more true in jny: Istanbul, Turkey: not a conventional jazz capitol, far from the African-American roots of jazz, and even beyond the music's major continental domiciles. Yet the tilting cobblestoned streets of ...

ARTICLE: LIVE REVIEWS

Tony Miceli: Vibraphone All-Star Jam Session at Chris’ Jazz Cafe

Read "Tony Miceli: Vibraphone All-Star Jam Session at Chris’ Jazz Cafe" reviewed by Victor L. Schermer

Tony Miceli and Company
Vibraphone All-Star Jam Session / Steve Weiss Mallet Festival
Chris' Jazz Café
Philadelphia, PA
August 3, 2019

It's hard to imagine how five (if you include a special guest, six) vibraphone players can come together to provide an hour or so of ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

The Modern Jazz Quartet and the Third Stream (1956 - 1961)

Read "The Modern Jazz Quartet and the Third Stream (1956 - 1961)" reviewed by Russell Perry

As the Modern Jazz Quartet, members of which were once Dizzy Gillespie's rhythm section in the 1940s, moved into the 1960s, they continued to swing in their own quiet way, even as their music director, pianist John Lewis, explored the third stream, a synthesis of jazz and classical music. Having been founded in 1952, the MJQ ...

Meet Andrew Rothman

Read "Meet Andrew Rothman" reviewed by Tessa Souter and Andrea Wolper

Lawyer, audiophile, lifelong arts enthusiast, our newest Super Fan's life plan was to be a classical pianist, until college took him in another direction. But it was two “major epiphanies" (the first time he heard Miles Davis and, later, Bill Evans) that turned him into a jazz Super Fan--such a Super Fan, in fact, that he ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEWS

Monty Alexander: Still Rolling

Read "Monty Alexander: Still Rolling" reviewed by Geno Thackara

If there's one defining quality to Monty Alexander's music, it's joy. An unmistakable undercurrent of happiness has been constant across several decades, dozens of recordings and countless performances all over the world. He could be honoring classic jazz balladeers, exploring the danceable “riddims" of his native Jamaica or anything in between, and you can always hear ...

ARTICLE: LIVE REVIEWS

Festival International de Jazz de Montréal 2019: Week 2

Read "Festival International de Jazz de Montréal 2019: Week 2" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

Various Venues
Festival International de Jazz de Montréal
Montréal, Canada
July 2-6, 2019

The festival celebrated its 40th anniversary this year with the usual dazzling array of musical offerings. And a few that were unusual: including concerts celebrating the 50th anniversary of ECM Records (founder Manfred Eicher was awarded the Bruce ...

Martin Fabricius Trio: Under The Same Sky

Read "Under The Same Sky" reviewed by Chris May

The vibraphone has come a long way—technically and aesthetically—since Lionel Hampton used it in a short, improvised introduction to Louis Armstrong's “Confessin,'" recorded with Les Hite's band in 1930. Back then, it was regarded primarily as a percussion instrument, and it is still categorized as tuned-percussion in the classical music world. Hampton was the first musician ...

CTI on BGO, Part 2

Read "CTI on BGO, Part 2" reviewed by Jakob Baekgaard

2018 proved to be a very good year for reissues of CTI-albums on the British label, BGO. They stepped up with an abundance of albums from the likes of guitarist Jim Hall, saxophonist Stanley Turrentine and flautist Hubert Laws (you can read about them here). So far, 2019 also looks promising and kicks off with releases ...