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ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Kihong Jang: They Brought A New Kind of Music To Me

Read "They Brought A New Kind of Music To Me" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Kihong Jang's debut record as a leader is the antithesis of the hectic, anxious character of many contemporary jazz releases. The guitarist's unassuming approach contains an impressive degree of depth and certainty for a young musician. The disc's six tracks offer affably swinging sounds that aren't particularly knotty, convoluted or strained. Original compositions, choice of tempos ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Doron Tirosh: Simply Because It's Winter

Read "Simply Because It's Winter" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Drummer/composer Doron Tirosh's Simply Because It's Winter brings to mind the adage “good things come in small packages." The six tracks comprise a coherent piece of work in twenty-five minutes of running time. Along with pianist Michael Kanan and bassist Neal Miner, Tirosh achieves a kind of courtly, non-doctrinaire bebop essence. It's jazz that doesn't need ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Salvo Losappio: Long Story Short

Read "Long Story Short" reviewed by Jack Bowers

Although Long Story Short is an entirely appropriate title for Italian-born tenor saxophonist Salvo Losappio's debut CD as leader, as its playing time is a lean LP-like thirty-eight minutes, Rush Job might have been an even better one. Losappio's name and face adorn the front cover of the album, which names his four sidemen but does ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Champian Fulton: After Dark

Read "After Dark" reviewed by Edward Blanco

Veteran New York pianist and vocalist Champian Fulton offers another recording of time-honored standards on After Dark, except this particular effort focuses on the music of the Queen of the Blues, the music of the great Dinah Washington, who was her first major vocalist influence early on in her life. Though she grew up listening to ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Eyal Vilner Big Band: Almost Sunrise

Read "Almost Sunrise" reviewed by Jack Bowers

Suddenly, it seems, the state of Israel has become a focal point and incubator for contemporary jazz. A new wave of world-class musicians led by the three Cohens (not to be confused with Broadway's three Cohans) has crossed the ocean to plant the Israeli flag firmly in the midst of what was once considered an unassailable ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

David Sills: Blue's the New Green

Read "Blue's the New Green" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Saxophonist David Sills opens his Blue's the New Green with tenor sax titan Sonny Rollins' tune, “No Moe." But Sills doesn't use Rollins' musculature or his burly tone. He rolls more in the mode of sax men Joe Henderson or Stan Getz--or, to take it back further, Coleman Hawkins or Ben Webster, with a smooth, vibrato-less ...

ARTICLE: EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Josh Brown: Songbook Trio

Read "Josh Brown: Songbook Trio" reviewed by Geannine Reid

Trombonist Josh Brown was raised in Burlington, Ontario. His mother was a music teacher and his father was an avid jazz fan. It is no surprise that Brown grew up playing in school and city bands, eventually winning local and national competitions and eventually attended Humber College in Toronto, where he studied music. Brown also went ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Richie Vitale: Vitalogy

Read "Vitalogy" reviewed by Edward Blanco

Richie Vitale is a fixture of the New York music scene, a veteran trumpeter with a resume that includes The Buddy Rich Big Band, Count Basie and Duke Ellington, the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Orchestra and the Vanguard Jazz Orchestra. Vitalogy is not a big band recording, but features Vitale in a quintet format blowing through a ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Eyal Vilner Big Band: Introducing The Eyal Vilner Big Band

Read "Introducing The Eyal Vilner Big Band" reviewed by Hrayr Attarian

Most contemporary big band music is either of the heavily arranged, progressive jazz variety or the light-swing, Glenn Miller orchestral type played mainly for the benefit of nostalgic dancers. It is therefore refreshing to hear an ensemble that embraces the exuberance of mid-20th Century large groups and simultaneously delivers a bop-ish and elaborate sound.

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Eyal Vilner Big Band: Introducing The Eyal Vilner Big Band

Read "Introducing The Eyal Vilner Big Band" reviewed by Edward Blanco

Tel Aviv, Israel-born saxophonist, composer and bandleader Eyal Vilner moved to New York City in 2007 to continue his studies at the New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music. After touring Israel in the summer of 2008, he decided to establish a New York version of his all-star Israeli big band. Enlisting fourteen of the city's ...