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ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh/Garth Knox: All Soundings Are True

Read "All Soundings Are True" reviewed by Ian Patterson

Unlike notated music, where one wrongly sounded note can jar terribly, improvised music obeys no stringent laws. It can jar but it's never wrong. Indeed, the concept of what constitutes music--our appreciation or tolerance for some sounds but not others--is frequently challenged by improvisers, for whom all sounds are valid. Fiddler Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh (This Is ...

ARTICLE: MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Diatribe Records Solo Series II

Read "Diatribe Records Solo Series II" reviewed by Ian Patterson

Four years on from Diatribe Records' outstanding Solo Series I, which featured solo piano recordings by Izumi Kimura and Isabelle O'Connell, a guitar solo offering from Simon Jermyn and a clarinet solo work from Paul Roe, the Dublin label is back with the equally impressive Solo Series II. The four musicians presented in this second round ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

OKO: I Love You Computer Mountain

Read "I Love You Computer Mountain" reviewed by Ian Patterson

While pretty much all music is derivative, and to a greater or lesser degree inspired by what has gone before, every so often a band appears that shakes up the status quo. OKO--formed in 2010 out of the jny:Dublin collective Bottleneck--certainly doesn't hide its influences on its debut recording, but its musical paint box of electronica, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Francesco Turrisi: Grigio

Read "Grigio" reviewed by Alberto Bazzurro

Album composito, sporto su diversi crinali, quello che ci propone il pianista e compositore torinese Francesco Turrisi, in realtà espatriato ormai da diciassette anni, prima all'Aja e poi a Dublino, dove si è ottimamente inserito in un tessuto in cui la componente jazzistica si mischia felicemente con svariate altre.

In questo Grigio, per ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Francesco Turrisi: Grigio

Read "Grigio" reviewed by Ian Patterson

For pianist Francesco Turrisi 'old' music is a redundant term. In the Dublin-based Italian's world all music exists in a continuum. Turrisi's debut, Si Dolce e il Tormento (Diatribe Records, 2009) may be the only example of the mediaeval theorbo--a long-necked lute-- in a jazz setting. Fotografia (Diatribe Records, 2011)--a series of piano trio improvisations--veered between ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

ReDiviDeR: ReDiviDeR meets I Dig Monk, Tuned

Read "ReDiviDeR meets I Dig Monk, Tuned" reviewed by Ian Patterson

Jazz/creative music fans who dig palindromes and anagrams had to wait a long time between trumpeter Miles Davis' Live Evil (Columbia, 1971) and ReDiviDeR's debut Never Odd or EveN (Diatribe Records, 2011). Forty years must be an eternity for addicts of words that spell the same way backwards as they do forwards. In addition to the ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Thought-Fox: My Guess

Read "My Guess" reviewed by Ian Patterson

Thought-Fox is a quintet led by Lauren Kinsella, whose adventurism was already apparent on All This Talk About (WideEarRecords, 2012), an intimate series of improvisations with drummer Alex Huber. In a short time, the Irish singer has garnered glowing praise for her voice--a thing of rare beauty--and for her very personal improvisational style. Improvisations certainly color ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

ReDiviDeR: Never Odd or EveN

Read "Never Odd or EveN" reviewed by Ian Patterson

ReDiviDeR was born in 2007, when drummer Matthew Jacobson gathered some of Ireland's finest creative musicians to give voice to his compositions. Its debut, recorded live, has an undeniably visceral impact. Jacobson's compositions are like fine sketches around which the musicians add their own bold colors, seeking collective form and harmony. Improvisation of a post-modern and ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Francesco Turrisi: Fotographia

Read "Fotographia" reviewed by Greg Simmons

Encouraging experimentation is the lifeblood of jazz. It keeps the music vital and ensures that new voices get to have their say. The minute the music becomes a museum relic, played through a fixed, orthodox interpretation, is the moment it dies an ignominious death. Thank goodness, then, for musicians like pianist Francesco Turrisi, who embraces creative ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Francesco Turrisi: Fotografia

Read "Fotografia" reviewed by Ian Patterson

It would be simplistic to call pianist Francesco Turrisi an experimenter, though his music embraces myriad cultural influences, from his native Italy through the length and breadth of the Mediterranean, straddling the centuries, and imbibing from sources as diverse as baroque, Moorish airs and jazz; simplistic, because his music flows as naturally as a river follows ...