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ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Lafayette Gilchrist: Soul Progressin'

Read "Soul Progressin'" reviewed by Jay Deshpande

On Soul Progressin', Lafayette Gilchrist mixes a funky sensibility with, above all else, a sense of play. The album showcases the young pianist's compositions in a no-holds-barred, gutsy display of honest sound. Throughout, Gilchrist is supported by the strong horn section (two trumpets, three saxophones) that defines his band, the New Volcanoes.

Gilchrist ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Glenn White: Sacred Machines

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New York-based saxophonist Glenn White presents a set of eloquent and somewhat haunting tunes on Sacred Machines. The machines herein are a platform for the strong soloists in the ensemble, but the album's unity comes from a common palette that transcends the bandleader's harmonic tendencies (White wrote six of the disc's seven songs). Sacred Machines presents ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Hot Club of Detroit: Night Town

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The Hot Club of Detroit will without a doubt soon be among the most popular bands playing in the gypsy tradition of jazz manouche. Django Reinhardt's band, the Hot Club de France, first brought the fiery, flamenco-infused sound to the realm of jazz. In homage to and elaboration of the tradition, the HCOD presents its sophomore ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Stephen Anderson: Forget Not

Read "Forget Not" reviewed by Jay Deshpande

Pianist Stephen Anderson is an exemplar of the scholar-musician. Although jazz education is an ever-growing field, it's rare to find someone who succeeds in both disciplines, as a player and an academic. Perhaps because jazz is so fundamentally founded on “feel," it leaves less space open for the rational or analytical. But at least some of ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Andreas Oberg: My Favorite Guitars

Read "My Favorite Guitars" reviewed by Jay Deshpande

Swedish guitarist Andreas Oberg's My Favorite Guitars is that rare thing among jazz albums: a wolf in sheep's clothing. As the title suggests, Oberg concentrates here on the songs of his major influences (probably the most prominent among them is Pat Martino, and to a lesser extent Django Reinhardt). And throughout the disc's twelve tracks, the ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Norberto Tamburrino: Prigioniero del Mare / Prisoner of The Sea

Read "Prigioniero del Mare / Prisoner of The Sea" reviewed by Jay Deshpande

On his sophomore effort Prigioniero del Mare / Prisoner of The Sea, Italian pianist Norberto Tamburrino continues to chart his course through a host of original compositions. Although he tests the waters with more trio arrangements than on his preceding album, Deco (Splasc(H), 2006), his greatest strength continues to lie in his solo work.

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Eyran Katsenelenbogen: 88 Fingers

Read "88 Fingers" reviewed by Jay Deshpande

Eyran Katsenelenbogen's solo piano work has received the highest praise that a jazz pianist can be given: he has been likened to Art Tatum. Although Tatum is widely considered the most virtuosic piano improviser of the last century, players are hardly ever compared to him. To be associated with the man who Fats Waller referred to ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

George Kahn: Cover Up!

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In the liner notes to Cover Up!, George Kahn discusses his goal of drawing upon the heritage of west coast jazz. For most people, this brings to mind Gerry Mulligan, Chet Baker, or the Lighthouse All Stars.

For Kahn, though, it means a particular way of portraying the popular songs of his youth--tunes ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Dave Stryker Quartet: Strike Up The Band

Read "Strike Up The Band" reviewed by Jay Deshpande

Dave Stryker is a strong guitarist with an excellent back-catalog of credits to his name. While Strike Up The Band doesn't show off his full capabilities in their best light, it makes for a listenable jaunt, and a clear reminder that musicians on Stryker's level can seek out more demanding material.

The album ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

The Alon Farber Hagiga Sextet: Optimistic View

Read "Optimistic View" reviewed by Jay Deshpande

No other way to put it: the Alon Farber Hagiga Sextet is a fantastic find. First formed in 2001 by saxophonist Alon Farber and drummer Dani Benedikt, Hagiga has developed a tasteful interplay while melding disparate musical traditions from around the world. As Israelis, the band-members draw on a heritage of confluence and intersection. Mirroring their ...