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Content by tag "Posi-Tone Records"

Walt Weiskopf: Fountain Of Youth

Read "Fountain Of Youth" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Fountain Of Youth is the latest installment of Walt Weiskopf's mid-career renaissance. In reviews of Weiskopf's three previous Posi-Tone releases, I made the misstep of treating his imposing skills as a tenor saxophonist, composer, arranger, and bandleader as separate, albeit compatible entities; this time around I realized that they are indeed parts of a larger, all-encompassing ...

Jon Davis: Happy Juice

Read "Happy Juice" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

Everyone has their own version of happy juice. For some, it's the drink; for others, it's literature; for many, it's film; and for a certain breed, it's jazz, that most potent and unpredictable of aural intoxicants. It's the people that fall into that last group who are most likely to quickly uncork this one and take ...

Theo Hill: Promethean

Read "Promethean" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Promethean captures Theo Hill at a significant juncture in his development. The record is ample evidence that the thirty-something New York City-based artist is rapidly securing a place in the crowded field of noteworthy contemporary jazz pianists. On the one hand--particularly during medium and up-tempo cuts such as “This Here," “Hey, It's Me You're Talking To," ...

Champian Fulton: Speechless

Read "Speechless" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

Speechless is a date that may be best classified as a centrist statement, but it's far from the norm for Champian Fulton. While many have come to know and admire Fulton for her arresting vocals and piano work, both usually given in service to Great American Songbook classics, she's not conforming to those expectations here. For ...

Amanda Monaco: Glitter

Read "Glitter" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

The multi-talented Mae West once said that “personality is the glitter that sends your little gleam across the footlights and the orchestra pit into that big black space where the audience is." West, of course, thrived in a different era, worked in different formats, and was more than likely addressing another artistic discipline entirely with that ...

Vinnie Sperrazza: Juxtaposition

Read "Juxtaposition" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

The most intriguing thing about Juxtaposition, Vinnie Sperrazza's recently released recording, is its loose grip on the jazz tradition. The disc's twelve tracks don't come with a set of standard, recognizable references. Not unlike many of today's leading young artists, Sperrazza has absorbed the lessons of the music's past, and is currently interested in doing things ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Ken Fowser: Now Hear This!

Read "Now Hear This!" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan

Taking a cue from some of the other smaller jazz-based labels, Posi-Tone has done a remarkable job over the past few years of building a roster of budding talents worthy of wider recognition. Part of the allure of such an endeavor is the ability to see the evolution of an artist's muse unfolding like a rose. ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Art Hirahara: Central Line

Read "Central Line" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

The central meaning behind pianist Art Hirahara's Central Line is simple to suss out. In literal terms Hirahara is referencing the Chuo-Sen (Central Line) subway line, a means for establishing his own relationship to the jazz world in Tokyo. But the message of the album runs deeper than that, tapping into the central lines that link ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Michael Dease: All These Hands

Read "All These Hands" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

Trombonist Michael Dease is never short on ideas, but this one might be his best yet: With All These Hands, Dease traces the early migratory patterns of jazz through his own well-crafted originals. He starts in NOLA and moves along to many a music mecca, including the Mississippi Delta, Chicago, Detroit, Philadelphia, Washington D.C., and New ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Behn Gillece: Dare To Be

Read "Dare To Be" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

It pays to listen to Dare To Be, Behn Gillece's second release as a leader for Posi-Tone Records, from the bottom up. Bassist Ugonna Okegwo and drummer Jason Tiemann are one of most congenial, articulate, and straightforward bass and drums team in recent memory. They're self-effacing, deeply focused and frisky. Regardless of the differences in the ...


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