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ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Patrick Cornelius: This Should Be Fun

Read "This Should Be Fun" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

This Should Be Fun occupies middle ground between the various modes of experimentation that infuse present-day jazz, and a fealty to traditional practices. Alto saxophonist Patrick Cornelius and an exceptional band of peers haven't completely abandoned twentieth century jazz orthodoxy, yet their work doesn't flaunt or reference specific, easily recognizable influences. If you're looking for song ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Josh Lawrence: Triptych

Read "Triptych" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Triptych succeeds on the connection between Josh Lawrence's writing and a coterie of players with whom he has been associated for several years. A brilliant, enterprising band comprised of the leader's trumpet, pianist Zaccai Curtis, his brother, bassist Luques Curtis, alto saxophonist Caleb Curtis (no relation), and drummer Anwar Marshall readily embrace the contours of Lawence's ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Something Blue: Maximum Enjoyment

Read "Maximum Enjoyment" reviewed by Paul Rauch

Maximum Enjoyment is a curated effort by Posi-Tone producer Marc Free to feature the label's artists individually and collectively. The recording features a talented front-line of alto saxophonist Alexa Tarantino, trombonist Nick Finzer, and tenor saxophonist Sam Dillon, backed by an uber rhythm section featuring pianist Art Hirahara, bassist Boris Kozlov, and drummer Rudy Royston.

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Michael Dease: Bonafide

Read "Bonafide" reviewed by Geannine Reid

Trombonist Michael Dease was born in Augusta, Georgia. His propensity for the arts landed him at John S. Davidson Fine Arts Magnet High School, where he studied saxophone, voice and trumpet. During his senior year, after sage advice from another Augusta, Georgia jazz mainstay, Wycliffe Gordon, Dease pointed his ambition towards the trombone, what would ultimately ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Michael Dease: Bonafide

Read "Bonafide" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Listening critically to recently produced mainstream-jazz recordings often feels like prospecting for gold amidst the dross of familiar templates, all-too-common stylistic references, and unremarkable performances. However, occasionally, even when a record doesn't hang together particularly well and is likely to disappear under the weight of scores of similar sounding releases, diligence is rewarded by a track ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Doug Webb: Fast Friends

Read "Fast Friends" reviewed by Mark Corroto

There is nothing as soul cleansing as bebop. Period. When you couple the music with the sunshine of Los Angeles (OK, when the smog has cleared) there is a medicinal, tonic effect to be had. Enter L.A. session saxophonist Doug Webb, a contributor to film and television, and member of big bands led by Bill Holman, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Tom Tallitsch: Wheelhouse

Read "Wheelhouse" reviewed by David A. Orthmann

Tom Tallitsch's Wheelhouse is a recording in which something honest and genuine springs from the soil of a long established, familiar jazz style. Although pinning a hard bop label on the music is fairly accurate, ultimately it amounts to a quick, glib, descriptive fix that may distort or diminish the character of the record. The same ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Lauren Sevian: Bliss

Read "Bliss" reviewed by Paul Rauch

Since joining the Mingus Big Band in 2003, baritone saxophonist Lauren Sevian has been opening eyes in the saxophone world, especially in the exclusive club that includes those dedicated primarily to the bari. Her style more resembles that of modern tenor players such as Donny McCaslin and Mark Turner, while retaining the pure sound and articulation ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Theo Hill: Interstellar Adventures

Read "Interstellar Adventures" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic

Hot on the heels of his heralded 2017 effort Promethean, the five covers and five originals on his latest Interstellar Adventures serve as rousing calling-cards for Theo Hill as he continues his steady, determined ascent into the contemporary ranks of vital and inspired jazz pianists.

With the exciting, percussive talents of bassist Rashaan Carter ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEWS

Nick Finzer: No Arrival

Read "No Arrival" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky

To say a musician has arrived is to create the ultimate paradox. For in that notion is the suggestion of reaching the upper echelon in the art form, but also an indication of the end of a journey and the start of stagnation. With the true seeker and master musician, there is no arrival; there's merely ...